HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Green Knight, The
Beasts of No Nation
One of Our Aircraft is Missing
Picture Stories
Another Round
Tape, The
Limbo
Supernova
Man Who Sold His Skin, The
Sweetheart
No Man of God
Gaia
Oliver Sacks: His Own Life
Scenes with Beans
Sweat
Quiet Place Part II, A
Nobody
Prisoners of the Ghostland
Duel to the Death
Mandibles
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands
Yakuza Princess
Djinn, The
New Order
Triggered
Claw
Original Cast Album: Company
Martyrs Lane
Paper Tigers, The
Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, The
Hall
ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt, The
Collini Case, The
Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard
Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch, The
Superhost
Plan A
When I'm a Moth
Tigers Are Not Afraid
Misha and the Wolves
   
 
Newest Articles
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
   
 
  London Road Moving Right Along
Year: 2015
Director: Rufus Norris
Stars: Olivia Colman, Tom Hardy, Anita Dobson, Nick Holder, Eloise Lawrence, Kate Fleetwood, Paul Thornley, James Doherty, Janet Henfrey, Paul Blackwell, Lee Nicholas Harris, Alexia Kadime, Lynne Wilmot, Michael Shaeffer, Jenny Galloway, Calvin Demba
Genre: Musical, Drama, DocumentaryBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: In Ipswich near the end of 2006, there occurred a shocking series of murders, with five prostitutes the victims, all of whom had been picked up around the London Road area which had become a blackspot for prostitution, much to the middle class residents’ dismay. That these crimes had happened was a culmination of exactly how bad the situation had grown, and the locals reacted with a mixture of suspicion, resignation and anger, especially when the media moved in as it made their homes look like a breeding ground for the worst of humanity – and some would include the drug-addicted prostitutes in that assessment. As the police investigation continued, the questions continued to be asked, the big one being, could our neighbour be a serial killer?

London Road began life as a series of interviews with those locals who had lived through the media blitz and felt their lives suffer as a result of Steve Wright, the actual killer, and his crimes, if only by the unpleasant association. Writer Alecky Blythe then teamed up with composer Adam Cork who set her interviews to music, which was then adapted into a stage musical by expert theatre director Rufus Norris, and when that was a success, making it into a film seemed like the logical step. However, as you can imagine this was never going to be for everybody, and the mere motion of creating a musical out of such harrowing events was to many minds deeply offensive, even to those who actually liked musicals.

On watching it, however, you could find yourself thinking about the events in a different way, not so much the murders which everyone would agree (so you’d hope) were abhorrent, but on the general reaction to them, be that by the man or woman in the street or the media who descended upon the place. Proving that the musical genre was not the sole preserve of showtunes, when the cast break into song, it’s arranged as part of their speech patterns, complete with pauses, “ums” and “ahs” and verbal crutches to keep the dialogue going precisely as the original interviewees had spoken, only the melody was close to the pattern and tone of everyday speech, but more tuneful to create songs of a sort. It was strangely compelling.

However, such was the novelty of hearing these so-called “verbatim” songs that you did find yourself concentrating more on the way things were sung rather than what information was imparted and as a consequence you may miss much of what the point of Blythe’s highlighting of these specific passages would be. What was most striking was that this was no murder mystery, indeed the identity of the killer barely seemed to matter and he didn’t feature in person, or with an actor playing him, whatsoever, again it was all very reactive: how would you feel if someone in your community, someone you may not even have met, turned out to be committing dreadful crimes, how does that reflect on you that you would allow this?

Of course, you’re not allowing this, it was the perpetrator who was the culprit and their fault entirely, but when we hear the animosity from the London Road residents towards the prostitutes it makes you ponder if they cared more about saving face when the world’s attention was focused on them rather than the victims whose lives had been so utterly hopeless. When the prostitutes get their song to sing, it’s as if they’re from a different planet such are their concerns, and there’s little indication their quality of life will improve any time soon as the residents in contrast used the infamy and shame to revitalise their neighbourhood with community spirit-led garden contests and quiz nights. You could observe that at least some good came of the atrocity, but the film also acknowledges a serious loss of innocence once the society has been through a stage of looking at every man and worrying he may be a multiple murderer, something this obliquely applies to the whole of Britain. Incidentally, don’t watch this expecting lots of Tom Hardy singing, he’s only in one and a half scenes and appears to have been added for publicity reasons.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1830 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: