HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Perfect 10
Octaman
Red Penguins
China Syndrome, The
Babyteeth
Round-Up, The
Around the Sun
Once There Was Brasilia
Peripheral
Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street
Ice
She Demons
Good Girls, The
Hail, Hero!
Faces in the Crowd
Tamango
Traitor, The
Tomorrow
Third Generation, The
Saxon Charm, The
Spy Intervention
Moonrise
Mulan
Killer with a Thousand Eyes, The
Vigil, The
Liberation of L.B. Jones, The
Wizard of Baghdad, The
Ride
Good Manners
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
Sweet Home
Big Score, The
Siddhartha
Three Outlaw Samurai
Echoes of Fear
Guinea Pig, The
Truth, The
Good Die Young, The
Old Guard, The
Gumnaam
   
 
Newest Articles
Network On Air: Nights in with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
Country Matters: Further Out of Town on Blu-ray
Bat-Damn: Was Joel Schumacher's Batman Really That Bad?
The Beat Goes On: Takeshi Kitano Collection on Blu-ray
Dream Treats: Scorsese Shorts on Blu-ray
It's Only Money: Laughter in Paradise on Blu-ray
A Regular Terpsichore: Dance, Girl, Dance on Blu-ray
Teenage Trauma: Baby Love on Blu-ray
The Happening: Pet Shop Boys It Couldn't Happen Here on Blu-ray
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
   
 
  Avengers: Age of Ultron One Blam Thing After Another
Year: 2015
Director: Joss Whedon
Stars: Robert Downey Jr, Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo, Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson, Jeremy Renner, James Spader, Samuel L. Jackson, Don Cheadle, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Paul Bettany, Cobie Smulders, Anthony Mackie, Hayley Atwell
Genre: Action, Science Fiction, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: The superhero team known as The Avengers are in the midst of battle, seeking to claim a sceptre with incredible power that has fallen into the wrong hands, those hands belonging to a team of dangerous East European scientists who have been conducting experiments to create enhanced human beings. Their proudest achievements have been the Maximoff twins, codenamed Quicksilver (Aaron Taylor-Johnson) and Scarlet Witch (Elizabeth Olsen), the former who can move at incredible speed and the latter who can manipulate matter with her mind – and cause her victims to be seriously mentally disrupted with psychic visions. So it is when Avenger Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr) finally breaks into the castle stronghold, the Witch shocks him with the sight of all his allies lying dead…

The need to change the world either makes you a do-gooder or a megalomaniac, at least according to your average superhero movie, and this sequel to the first Avengers entry was no different, only writer and director Joss Whedon chose to blur the lines between the two in the characters of Downey’s Tony Stark and his invention, the machine entity Ultron (James Spader making with the motion capture). Ultron in this incarnation could really have done with more “Fools! I shall destroy them all!” dialogue, yet Whedon conjured up a far more reasonable-sounding villain, if his goal of wiping out humanity sounded reasonable. What was crucial was it was perfectly sensible to him, for he had been manufactured to create peace, and since humankind were the ones making the most war, we needed to be gotten rid of.

It’s the sort of machine logic that many a science fiction creation has followed, from HAL-9000 to WOPR and far beyond, but perhaps it was more sadly relevant than ever to the world this follow-up was released to, so this was an improvement when Whedon made an issue of saving lives for his heroes to participate in. In the twenty-first century there were tales of mass destruction in the news every day, and that was the atmosphere our Avengers were battling in, real events bleeding into the fiction in a manner that suggested even if you had superpowers there was no guarantee you would be able to stop the worst aspects of Planet Earth’s population set at each other’s throats for reasons they could barely articulate most of the time. In Ultron, you had every fanatic rolled into one robot body, and he had his own army too, proof that the wrong ideas had a way of spreading like a virus.

Well, he was a presence on the internet, so that was understandable, if not excusable. Otherwise, it was CGI combat galore, so much so that even with the highest possible stakes – the prevention of the end of the human race – the fact that we were watching the impossible every five minutes did tend to take away the novelty factor with increasing regularity. Whedon’s ace in the pack was his approach to character, emphasising the Avengers were a family of sorts, prone to falling out but also to acts of great affection and support for their comrades, with the camaraderie pulled into place with greater ease than the shallow first instalment, as if he was getting the hang of what he’d been requested to carry out and was allowing more distinct personalities. Not that the passages of character building were integrated entirely smoothly, but that sense of overcoming a modern terror papered over certain cracks.

Nevertheless, there were still places where the film could have thought up better developments than what it offered, with Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) very much the token woman once again, and to prove it she suffered the fate of every female lead in every action flick ever: she was kidnapped by the baddie. Olsen, while a supporting role, had a more interesting arc though that was the basic redemption one, so it was yet another case of Marvel movies as a boy’s club reluctantly allowing the girls a go on their toys, unless you were Hawkeye (Jeremy Renner) in which case you always came across as the gooseberry, but you wouldn’t want Johansson as the female Renner, would you? In better news, Chris Hemsworth finally had dialogue worthy of him when Whedon had a handle on the Thor character, and The Hulk (Mark Ruffalo) was a more interesting interpretation of nerd rage than ever before; that said, Chris Evans as Captain America looked a little at sea when he wasn’t headlining his own feature. But it was that drive to be saviours that aptly saved Age of Ultron itself, if we had any decency ourselves we could cheer them on in that while accepting as in comics, as in life, “The End” doesn’t apply. Music by Danny Elfman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4694 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: