HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Letter from Paris
Behind the Mask
Lucky
Matrix, The
Undergods
Betrayed
Fried Barry
Once Upon a River
Cowboys
Atlantis
We Still Say Grace
Enfant Terrible
Nomadland
Playboy of the Western World, The
Bike Thief, The
Threshold
Virtuoso, The
Here are the Young Men
Beast Beast
Labyrinth of Cinema
Justice Society: World War II
Artist's Wife, The
Truman & Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation
Pusher III
Palm Springs
Devil Commands, The
Oak Room, The
Pusher II
Forget Everything and Run
Secrets & Lies
Red Moon Tide
Man with Nine Lives, The
Pusher
Pot Carriers, The
Black Bear
Don't Cry, Pretty Girls!
Portal
Me You Madness
Reckoning, The
Laddie: The Man Behind the Movies
   
 
Newest Articles
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
   
 
  Welcome to Me Don't Drag Us Into Your Private Hell
Year: 2014
Director: Shira Piven
Stars: Kristen Wiig, Wes Bentley, Linda Cardellini, Joan Cusack, Loretta Devine, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Thomas Mann, James Marsden, Tim Robbins, Alan Tudyk, Kulap Vilaysack, Mitch Silpa, Anelia Dyoulgerova, Joe Roland, Jack Wallace
Genre: Comedy, Drama, WeirdoBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Alice Klieg (Kristen Wiig) never turns off her television, in fact she considers it her best friend in the world, and when she’s not watching live programmes she has her extensive collection of videotapes to view, her favourite being Oprah Winfrey’s talk shows – she has one of them memorised, in particular an inspirational speech she believes offers all the life lessons she needs. But Alice is not a well woman, for she has borderline personality disorder and attends a psychiatrist (Tim Robbins) regularly, though he’s not sure how far he is progressing with her as she seems stuck in her own routine, watching TV, seeing her gym worker childhood pal Gina (Linda Cardellini), obsessing over food, oh, and buying a lottery ticket every day…

Ever since television began to establish itself in the homes of the planet, there have been commentators and satirists observing that its effects may not be the healthiest, and even now when it is so much a part of everyday existence for a great percentage of the population, there are films like Welcome to Me which question its voracious appetite for new personalities and novelties to keep the audience sated. This used the prism of mental illness to focus its energies on how individuals can believe everything they see on the box is there to fulfil them in ways a lot of other things in the real world cannot, merely by positioning itself as more real than reality, and Alice comes to think appearing on it will be the answer to all her problems.

Not simply the answer, but a way of demonstrating her issues in a confessional form of therapy, as she rejects her psychiatrist’s advice and starts her own television show called Welcome to Me in place of medication. How she does this is down to winning big on the lottery, millions and millions of dollars, which she channels into a programme she persuades her local, informercial-based station to broadcast because they desperately need the money. With a cast dotted with not all well-utilised famous faces, some with more to do than others, this was really Wiig’s showcase as she was able to play comedy and drama that mixes in her character's mental unbalance, and results in some very strange scenes which have you wondering, wait, is this bit supposed to be funny?

There were laughs all right, yet you quickly question if you should be laughing at a character who is obviously ill. Perhaps the best angle director Shira Piven brought out was that assertion there should be no taboo when presenting mental illness, and that sometimes it can be amusing and other times it can be tragic, yet also it can be selfish, for Alice obsesses over herself in a manner that society and the media have only encouraged, and not just for the afflicted. According to this we are all being invited to judge ourselves as media personalities; Alice has the chance to actually become one, but her constant diet of television arguably has set her up in this frame of mind well before she ever won her fortune as by aspiring to be one with the celebrity sphere the attraction to put yourself out there is irresistible.

Not everyone will have their own show, but now everyone has the opportunity to broadcast themselves thanks to their online presence which can also end up in other media, and Alice threatens to turn into less a human being and more a product she is shilling, all with her permission since she sees how the other people on TV do it and in her twisted manner emulates them. This sees her demonstrating anything from her diet tips (spending five minutes of airtime eating a meatloaf cake) to dramas drawn from her most traumatic experiences that she interrupts with yelling and crying to neutering dogs live on air (she used to be a vet’s assistant), and she builds up a big following from that awful fascination the extremes of human behaviour, even the eccentricities, can breed in media consumers. Wiig is a picture of deliberate idiosyncrasy, not quirky but obviously sick, even appearing nude in public in one scene to demonstrate that, not asking for sympathy but more an acknowledgement privacy is no bad thing if this is the alternative. A little too spiky to get on with, maybe, but full of interesting ideas. Music by David Robbins.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1556 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: