HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Last Seduction, The When She Was Bad She Was Better
Year: 1994
Director: John Dahl
Stars: Linda Fiorentino, Peter Berg, Bill Pullman, J.T. Walsh, Bill Nunn, Brien Varady, Dean Norris, Donna Wilson, Mik Scriba, Herb Mitchell, Renee Rogers, Walter Addison, Mike Lisenco, Serena, Michelle Davison, Jack Shearer, Erik Anders-Nilsson
Genre: Comedy, Drama, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Bridget Gregory (Linda Fiorentino) works in a call centre as one of the team bosses, where she knows what an incentive money can be to getting people to do what she wants. People like her husband Clay (Bill Pullman) who while she is finishing for the day at the office, is selling a large batch of medical cocaine he pilfered from his job as a doctor for a large sum; initially he thinks he has been taken for a ride, but his contacts wordlessly take the drugs and drop the bundles of cash on the ground. He gathers them up, stuffs them in his shirt and heads home to find Bridget waiting for him, where she drily calls him an idiot for his method of transportation, receiving a slap for her comment. No, Clay isn't the greatest of husbands, but then again it gives her the perfect excuse...

To do what? To run off with the fortune, that was what, in one of those film noir revivals of the nineteen-nineties of which this was an example brought into the world by British company ITC, best known for their television, which was why this debuted on the small screen. However, word of mouth was so strong, especially thanks to Fiorentino's performance as one of the most devious femmes fatales you ever did see, that it graduated to cinemas and was shown in those venues around the world, making her a briefly shining star of the decade. There was talk of an Oscar until the Academy pointed out they didn't hand over gongs for television movies, and would not be swayed when it was pointed out this was as much a big screen effort, maybe even more so.

Anyway, The Last Seduction was relegated to cult status, mostly thanks to the glee the audience could take in Bridget's humorous amorality which was really the engine Steve Barancik's script was powered by. It was clear that ITC wanted a Basic Instinct clone, or at least something Shannon Tweed fans wouldn't feel shortchanged by, but everyone in the production were more keen to explore the archetypes of film noir with a savage amusement, and Fiorentino proved the ideal embodiment of that with her calculating Bridget. Oddly, come the end of the nineties her stardom was more or less over, thanks to rumours of bad behaviour and being difficult to get on with; she barely graced the screen since then, though her fans prefer to believe she was too much of her own woman to tolerate the Hollywood merry-go-round.

Whatever the reasons, or a mixture of the two, we will always have this to observe a masterclass of how to make an unlikeable personality engaging, as we watch Bridget compulsively while she wraps the men around her little finger, even when they are well aware she's doing so. She ends up in a small town an hour's drive from Buffalo to hide out with the money until she works out a way of getting a vengeful Clay out of the picture, and you can see her piecing together a plan just as her husband does his level best to track her down. He knows her all too well, so you'd think he'd be able to better her in this game of wits, but she proves too wily: a notable aspect of this genre's revival in this era was the sympathy these films would have for the antiheroine, willing them on and practically cheering when they conspired to get things going their way.

Every femme fatale needs her fall guy, so if Clay is reluctant, how about a nice but dim chap who is far more willing? In the small town's bar, Bridget meets Mike Swale (Peter Berg, a future director in his own right), and he is keen to get acquainted so offers a chat up line that actually wins her interest. Before he knows it, they are partners in sex, though not the romance he craves with a sophisticated woman from out of town who just might take him away from all this, but the manner in which he keeps needling Bridget for information, not to mention hope, leaves him vulnerable to her manipulation. By the halfway point where we are confronted with the fact she is not above murder to keep the situation on her side, it's likely too late for Mike - and us, for we feel complicit since we were enjoying her charismatic nastiness too much. Add in J.T. Walsh as a lawyer friend, playing his scenes entirely on the phone yet still reminding us why he is so missed, and Bill Nunn as the smart but not smart enough detective, and you had yesterday's clich├ęs warmed over yet still tasty. Music by Joseph Vitarelli.

[The Network Blu-ray looks about as good as a film of this vintage and source is likely to get, and features a trailer and a short documentary as extras.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3795 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: