HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Benediction
Nezha Reborn
Evil Toons
Worst Person in the World, The
Whirlpool
Hunter Will Get You
Superman/Batman: Apocalypse
Revolver
Men, The
Parallel Mothers
Sadness, The
Bloody New Year
Faye
Body Count
Spider-Man: No Way Home
'Round Midnight
Wild Men
Barry & Joan
Wake Up Punk
Twin, The
Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy
One of These Days
Lift to the Scaffold
Savage Dawn
Rest in Pieces
Innocents in Paris
We're All Going to the World's Fair
Beyond the Door 3
Jules et Jim
Love Jones
Saint-Narcisse
Souvenir Part II, The
Knockabout
400 Blows, The
Virus: 32
Studio 666
Great Movement, The
Lost in La Mancha
Cellar, The
Sacred Spirit, The
   
 
Newest Articles
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
   
 
  What a Crazy World Gorblimey, Strike a Light
Year: 1963
Director: Michael Carreras
Stars: Joe Brown, Susan Maughan, Marty Wilde, Harry H. Corbett, Avis Bunnage, Michael Ripper, Grazina Frame, Monte Landis, Michael Goodman, Fanny Carby, Larry Dann, Brian Cronin, David Nott, Barry Bethel, Alan Klein, Tracey Rogers, Michael Robbins, Denise Coffey
Genre: MusicalBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Herbie (Marty Wilde) and his gang are causing trouble on the streets of London, pushing their way through a market bored because they have nothing useful to do, so they prefer to make a nuisance of themselves, such as telling a street vendor (Michael Ripper) who is blatantly selling dodgy goods that the police are on their way when they are nothing of the sort. Meanwhile housewives and mothers gossip and the dismay the older generation have for the younger is in the air, no wonder when Herbie and company visit the labour exchange and observe that it's almost entirely filled with foreigners, thus the boys will have no choice but to get a job. Their pal Alf Hitchens (Joe Brown) will have to consider this too...

But Alf has his sights set on showbusiness and plans to become a songwriter; if that works out, he could perform his own songs as well. This could be the very rare musical where the lead character's dreams do not come true, but you could tell from the opening fifteen minutes What a Crazy World was not one of those movies and a happy ending was on the cards. This was the film debut of band leader (the Bruvvers) and renowned guitarist Joe Brown, starring in the sort of pop musical that was just about to fall out of favour once The Beatles exploded on the scene and they had produced their own cash-in movie, A Hard Day's Night. Brown went on to appear in another one of these, Three Hats for Lisa, but even that a short time after looked like an anachronism.

Look to the deviser of the original stage work Alan Klein for the reasons behind that, not to be confused with the Rolling Stones manager Allen Klein for he was a singer-songwriter with a very strong opinion that British music should sound British - his only album, Well At Least It's British, went to great lengths to leave the listener in no doubt of that (his later spoof of Barry McGuire's Eve of Destruction, named Age of Corruption, isn't half bad). This might explain why he had crafted a musical noticeably following in the footsteps of Lionel Bart's Cockney stage hit Fings Ain't Wot They Used T'Be, which was never filmed but had an influence on British pop with the nation's everyday experience as its subject, so this film was very much a slice of life effort.

Brown was ideal for such an endeavour with his unpretentious charm and ability to carry a tune within a thick accent, and if Klein's tunes were much of a muchness in an early sixties fashion, with lyrics featuring such rhymes as "You're not the only fish that's in the sea/You're not the only bird that's in the tree", the star and his supporting cast put them across with gusto, though in real life Alf's titular hit barely scraped into the Top 40. That cast included another pop singer of the day, Susan Maughan who was just coming off the success of her single Bobby's Girl; here she played Marilyn, the on-off girlfriend of Alf whose scenes with him consist of mostly of arguments, and she gets to trill as well, as did most of those with more than one scene. Even Harry H. Corbett and Avis Bunnage as Alf's disparaging parents sang, and Klein himself showed up as a member of Herbie's gang.

Wilde was also a pre-Fabs pop star, towering above the other actors and making a strong double act with Brown as they go out on the town looking for birds and brawls. What they find is Freddie and the Dreamers singing about rhubarb and indulging in a trouser-losing routine onstage - incidentally, when the fight breaks out in the club they scarper like a bunch of wusses. Well, it wasn't a very convincing fight. Those who like to watch vintage movies to see the locations will be extremely well-served by What a Crazy World as most of it was shot in existing regions of London, so if you know the area you can spot where bits were set, and if not you can soak up as authentic an atmosphere as you can get assuming you don't mind the folks onscreen bursting into song every couple of minutes. Other than that, it wasn't really a comedy though there were jokes, it wasn't really a romance either no matter Maughan's presence, it was in the main a vehicle for celebrating a specific time and place and culture, and pretty sprightly as far as that went.

[Network's DVD of this title looks pristine in its original 2.35:1 aspect ratio and has a trailer and gallery as extras.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3768 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Enoch Sneed
   

 

Last Updated: