HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
Burning Sea, The
Godzilla Singular Point
Ace of Aces
Innocents, The
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Hide and Seek Don't Be Like Dad
Year: 1972
Director: David Eady
Stars: Peter Newby, Gary Kemp, Eileen Fletcher, Robin Askwith, Roger Avon, Richard Coleman, Frances Cuka, Roy Dotrice, Liz Fraser, Ben Howard, Godfrey James, Alan Lake, David Lodge, Alfred Marks, Terence Morgan, Johnny Shannon, Bernard Spear, Graham Stark
Genre: Drama, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Keith (Peter Newby) climbs over the wall of the approved school he has been sent to and makes a run for it, hitching a lift with a lorry driver who takes him to London, the borough of Deptford to be precise, where he is on a mission. But first he must find something to eat, and embarks on a life of crime by stealing food such as bread or an orange or a pint of milk from local traders - they give chase, but Keith is simply too fast and wily to be caught by them, and he finds a hideout in an abandoned basement flat to stay in while he continues his search. However, when he nicks a loaf of bread from the back of a bike belonging to Chris (Gary Kemp), it might be a step too far...

This Children's Film Foundation effort is likely most famous for starring a young Gary Kemp who used the wages he made from it to buy an electric guitar and never looked back as the driving force behind eighties New Romantic band Spandau Ballet beckoned. In the following decade he would become world famous and a multi-millionaire into the bargain with his musical prowess; his songs are still heard today, but as for the acting he didn't stick with it quite as much as his early years might have indicated, the gangland biopic The Krays being his highest profile role which he took alongside brother Martin Kemp, who would stick with acting, as it turned out.

Gary's Lahndahn accent was ideal for Hide and Seek, way back when, as this was a try at something a shade more gritty for the foundation as it moved into the seventies, so for a change there was no finale with the baddies falling into some water, although they do get their comeuppance after a fashion. Yet that is in a sense a Pyrrhic victory for Keith (or Keef, as Chris insists on calling him), since it deprived him of the father figure he so wished for, as what he has escaped that special school to do is track down his sole remaining parent (Terence Morgan), who in a cruel twist of fate, and demonstrating a moral complexity you wouldn't expect from this stable, is the film's bad guy, planning a robbery from his soon-to-be redeveloped bomb site base of operations.

As ever with C.F.F. productions, this is on the children's side all the way, so while Keith is labelled a criminal by the press (they call him "The Deptford Dodger") we in the audience can tell he is behaving out of necessity rather than vindictiveness or greed, as can Chris after a while in his company. Seeing his new pal, however wary they may be of one another, is in a desperate situation, Chris opts to assist, becoming the runaway's go-between and allowing a bunch of well-known British faces to make an appearance, from Liz Fraser as Keith's nasty stepmother who is persuading his father away to Canada without him, to likely lads Alan Lake (Diana Dors' last husband) and Robin Askwith (who needs no introduction) as the fake coppers the criminals have hired to pull off the theft.

Chris's father is a policeman, a real one (Godfrey James), which it is implied offers him the sense of right and wrong the unfortunate Keith, through no fault of his own, has not been brought up with, and we can tell he's a decent sort since he and his sister Beverley (Eileen Fletcher) run errands for a local elderly gent (Roy Dotrice in old age makeup and the world's grubbiest cardigan), though she tolerates his grumpiness and neediness more than her brother does. His is a subplot forgotten about before the conclusion as the narrative gets tied up with Keith's father and his attempts to capture his son to prevent him ruining his chances at the robbery, and his gang accidentally grab Chris in a case of mistaken identity, leaving his new pal and sister to save the day. What was interesting was that we were well aware Keith's wish for a stable home life with his dad was entirely futile, a harsh life lesson for the usual audience of the C.F.F. never mind the character, so the happy ending was tempered with melancholy. Music by Harry Robertson.

[Hide and Seek is released by the B.F.I. in one of their Children's Film Foundation DVDs entitled Runaways. It's part of a triple bill with Johnny on the Run and Terry on the Fence and includes a booklet of informative essays.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2872 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: