HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Hot Enough for June Dry spy games
Year: 1964
Director: Ralph Thomas
Stars: Dirk Bogarde, Sylva Koscina, Robert Morley, Leo McKern, Roger Delgado, Derek Fowlds, Amanda Grinling, Noel Harrison, Philo Hauser, John Junkin, Gertan Klauber, John Le Mesurier, Jill Mellford, Derek Nimmo, Richard Pasco, Eric Pohlman, Alan Tilvern
Genre: Comedy, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 2 votes)
Review: Struggling novelist Nicholas Whistler (Dirk Bogarde) reluctantly applies for a job with what he thinks is an advertising agency. In fact his employer, Colonel Cunliffe (Robert Morley) is actually head of British Intelligence. On the strength of his grasp of the Czech language, Whistler is sent on a mission to Prague for a spot of unwitting industrial espionage. Once there he is immediately smitten with his beautiful driver, Vlasta Simenova (Sylva Koscina) unaware that she is in turn spying on him on the orders of her father (Leo McKern), chief of the secret police.

Amusingly Cunliffe initially tells his subordinate to hire someone who will be less susceptible to the charms of lovely ladies. That would be Dirk Bogarde then, although the joke is meant to be that Nicholas Whistler is anything but. Hot Enough for June re-teamed Bogarde with Ralph Thomas, the director who brought him his first brush with stardom via the hit comedy Doctor in the House (1954) and its many sequels. By 1964 however, Bogarde had just made The Servant (1963) with Joseph Losey and was unenthused about this lightweight spy spoof. He did the film solely because he needed the money and his disinterest is sadly evident throughout. On the other hand one cannot judge Bogarde too harshly given this overly genteel comedy is decidedly low on laughs.

Adapted from the novel 'Night of Wenceslas' written by Lionel Davidson, Hot Enough for June (which draws its title from a code phrase Whistler exchanges with his Prague-based contact) seemingly cannot decide whether it is a send-up of all that James Bond stuff or a straight spy thriller. One minute Whistler is sneaking around Prague in a silly outfit or trading banter with Morley's avuncular spy chief, the next he is on the run in scenes of mild suspense (not the best sort) closer in tone to Thomas' remake of The 39 Steps (1959). Despite a promising premise (Whistler is the ultimate spy in that he does not know he is one), Thomas does not develop the humour along the lines of, say, The Man Who Knew Too Little (1997) and plays the espionage games, romance and character back stories surprisingly straight indulging in only the mildest satire of British foreign policy.

When Ian Fleming's James Bond novels first hit the stands, literary snobs derided them as ridiculous trash. Hot Enough for June comes across like a movie pitched to those same snobs. Told from a public school boy perspective with a very arch sense of humour, lots of digs at socialism and a snarky upper middle-class hero who, for a supposedly ordinary guy, proves surprisingly cool under pressure. Whistler is resourceful, handy with his fists and wastes no time making moves on an attractive woman. Hardly prime comedic material. Did the filmmakers think all public school graduates were like James Bond? Full of picturesque shots of Prague much of the film proves like watching someone amble around in holiday in dull detail. It takes a hell of a long time before Whistler even finds his contact and even that proves largely superfluous to the plot.

Though his adventures involved no gadgets there was glamour in the shapely form of Sylva Koscina. She actually gives a fairly captivating performance as an eye-catching enemy agent acting like she is in a remake of Ninotchka (1939) rather than a comedic misfire. She also supplied discreet nudity and racy bikini shots that likely won her a more memorable role in Thomas' subsequent superior spy spoof, Deadlier Than the Male (1966). As Bogarde cruises on auto-pilot it falls to Robert Morley to inject a little fun through some dry banter with Leo McKern as his affable opposite number. Familiar Brit flick players Noel Harrison, Derek Nimmo, Roger Delgado (future Master on Seventies Doctor Who) and Derek Fowlds (minus Basil Brush, alas) also pop up in supporting roles. It is all hopelessly quaint and lightweight though and makes one long for the crass silliness of a Matt Helm movie. Yes, really.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 5474 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: