HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Boss Level
My Heart Can't Beat Unless You Tell It To
Edge of the World
PTU
Superdeep
Insignificance
Treasure City
Piccadilly
Parallel
Invasión
Shiva Baby
Flowers of Shanghai
War and Peace
Agony
Merrily We Go to Hell
Ellie & Abbie (& Ellie's Dead Aunt)
Amusement Park, The
Lemebel
Hands of Orlac, The
Cats
Death has Blue Eyes
Caveat
Kala Azar
Duplicate
Flashback
Gunda
After Love
Earwig and the Witch
Zebra Girl
Skull: The Mask
Vanquish
Bank Job
Drunk Bus
Homewrecker
State Funeral
Army of the Dead
Initiation
Redoubt
Dinner in America
Death Will Come and Shall Have Your Eyes
   
 
Newest Articles
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
   
 
  Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer, The Act Your Age
Year: 1947
Director: Irving Reis
Stars: Cary Grant, Myrna Loy, Shirley Temple, Rudy Vallee, Ray Collins, Harry Davenport, Johnny Sands, Don Beddoe, Lillian Randolph, Veda Ann Borg, Dan Tobin, Ransom M. Sherman, William Bakewell, Irving Bacon, Ian Bernard, Carol Hughes, William Hall
Genre: Comedy, RomanceBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Susan Turner (Shirley Temple) is a seventeen-year-old who has been brought up by her older sister Margaret (Myrna Loy), a judge at the local courtroom. Susan is a little pretentious and given to caprice, which exasperates her sibling, but even she has no idea of what's in store for them both. That morning Margaret is overseeing a case of public disorder which happened at The Vampire nightclub, but one of those involved has not shown up, and she tells his lawyer that if Richard Nugent (Cary Grant) does not appear within the next few minutes he will be in contempt of court. He does eventually attend, and gives every indication of bafflement how he ever gets into these situations...

This was the movie that gave the author of many a doorstep-sized airport novel ideal for holiday reading, Sidney Sheldon, his Oscar, and was unusual that the Academy had seen fit to recognise a comedy when they often overlooked the finer examples of that genre. Perhaps it was down to the Second World War alll too fresh in the memories that they wanted to buoy the more escapist forms of entertainment and forget about all that horror for a while, and it was true enough that with its teenage characters and generation gap played for laughs The Bachelor and the Bobby-Soxer was looking ahead to the styles of the next decade rather than back to what had gone before.

Except of course there was one aspect here which was very much indebted to a star of yesteryear - by 1947 standards - and she was Shirley Temple. Already pretty much grown up and far from her days as the most famous little girl in the world during the Great Depression, she was finding problems fitting into a more mature role in the Hollywood of the forties, as seemingly everyone wished she had stayed somewhere around six years old and wasn't interested in watching her race towards adulthood. Soon after she had given up acting to raise a family and then politics beckoned, not too unhappy about leaving behind her acting career, though on this evidence she would have made a perfectly fair light comedienne.

It wasn't to be, but there is something undeniably... not odd, exactly, but difficult to get used to at seeing Shirley as a teenager and playing up those clichés for giggles, all airs and graces somewhere beyond her character's actual age which is why we're meant to accept Susan could fall for a much older man in Richard. He, as an artist, comes to talk to her school about his profession and she is immediately smitten; he is mildly amused but as a playboy isn't interested in romance with such a young girl, yet Susan is very insistent, even going to the extent of settling in his apartment when he is out (the bellboy lets her in) so that she may model for him when he gets back. This is where the main conceit arises, as Margaret (who was definitely not Susan's mother, oh no) and her boyfriend, the D.A. Rudy Vallee, catch up with them.

Cue Richard decking the D.A. in the confusion and needing the situation explained to him from a police cell, but Margaret has a solution prompted by her psychiatrist uncle (Ray Collins), one which would raise a few eyebrows if included in a comedy made today. So it is that Richard must take Susan out and romance her, all so that she can get over her crush and be let down gently, which with his ladies' man reputation must have featured a leap of faith that he would not take advantage of the set-up. But he doesn't and part of the reason we trust him is that he is played by the ever-urbane Grant, and also that Sheldon made it clear Richard is always getting into ridiculous scrapes which he has little power over. There's a nice sequence late on in a nightclub where this is demonstrated more than adequately where the humour gets as close to screwball comedy as it's ever likely to, yet while it's a pleasant way to pass the time for star fanciers, or those wondering of the origins of a famous exchange from Labyrinth, this is fairly inconsequential. Music by Leigh Harline.

Aka: Bachelor Knight
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3495 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
Andrew Pragasam
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: