HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
You've Been Trumped Too
Woman in Black, The
Elvis: That's the Way It Is
Man Who Laughs, The
Watch List
Giraffe
Kat and the Band
Echo
Perfect 10
Octaman
Red Penguins
China Syndrome, The
Babyteeth
Round-Up, The
Around the Sun
Once There Was Brasilia
Peripheral
Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street
Ice
She Demons
Good Girls, The
Hail, Hero!
Faces in the Crowd
Tamango
Traitor, The
Tomorrow
Third Generation, The
Saxon Charm, The
Spy Intervention
Moonrise
Mulan
Killer with a Thousand Eyes, The
Vigil, The
Liberation of L.B. Jones, The
Wizard of Baghdad, The
Ride
Good Manners
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
Sweet Home
Big Score, The
   
 
Newest Articles
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights in with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
Country Matters: Further Out of Town on Blu-ray
Bat-Damn: Was Joel Schumacher's Batman Really That Bad?
The Beat Goes On: Takeshi Kitano Collection on Blu-ray
Dream Treats: Scorsese Shorts on Blu-ray
It's Only Money: Laughter in Paradise on Blu-ray
A Regular Terpsichore: Dance, Girl, Dance on Blu-ray
Teenage Trauma: Baby Love on Blu-ray
The Happening: Pet Shop Boys It Couldn't Happen Here on Blu-ray
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
   
 
  Internecine Project, The The Oblivious Assassins
Year: 1974
Director: Ken Hughes
Stars: James Coburn, Lee Grant, Harry Andrews, Ian Hendry, Michael Jayston, Christiane Krüger, Keenan Wynn, Terence Alexander, Philip Anthony, Julian Glover, Mary Larkin, Ewan Roberts, David Swift, Rolf Wanka, Ray Callaghan, Ralph Ball
Genre: ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Professor Robert Elliot (James Coburn) is a powerful political mind who is willing to offer his advisory services to governments, and his influence only seems to be growing as fresh opportunities arise. Tonight he is on a television discussion programme, opining on the economy of the world of which he is something of an expert, when one of the other panelists is American journalist Jean Robertson (Lee Grant) who has been hounding him for a story for some time now. Though Elliot is interested in her, he is reluctant to take their professional, never mind social, relationship too far, and while he is happy to give her a lift, even as they talk he's giving nothing away...

But four people who might give something away are about to be of great concern to Elliot in The Internecine Project, a modest but satisfying thriller with outlandish and occasionally science fictional touches which only made the results more amusing. The main setpiece didn't arrive until the film was about halfway over, but it lasted practically the rest of the running time with it proving worth waiting for as the anti-hero, who was really more of an out and out villain, put his carefully crafted plans into action. The question remained: would he get away with it, or would the toppling dominoes he had set into action fail to achieve the goal he wished for?

Before you reached that, we were truly in post-Watergate territory. Elliot, you see, has been selected for a high position in the United States Government which may see him reach even higher, to the top job if possible, but as he plays golf with a colleague (Keenan Wynn) who is in the know, he comes to realise should any skeletons be in his closet they may well lurch out at the worst moment in the future. When Wynn tells him informally but with no less conviction for all that he would have no qualms about killing Elliot off if he were to become a problem, the Professor knows what he has to do: those four people he has been using as agents to get his own way must now be taken out of the picture.

But how to do so with methods which ensure he has no chance of being implicated? Here's the clever bit, he will implement that tactical supermind of his to orchestrate the deaths of each of the quartet, who don't know each other, by their own hands. No, not four suicides, but have them murder one of their counterparts in such a way that by the end of one night they will all be dead, and that high concept provided the main impetus for the intrigue, if only to find out if such a grand scheme could be pulled off. Director Ken Hughes, best known these days for making Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (an experience he hated), appeared to be on more confident footing with a considerably smaller scale than his then-recent works, and the final conception would not have been out of place in one of those television anthology series of the day.

Except this was considerably more violent in places than you would get on the box, what with a hammer murder and a strangling in the shower among other things to contend with, all carried out with the aplomb of a criminal mastermind. Barry Levinson, but not that Barry Levinson, was producing and co-screenwriting here, adapting a spy novel, although even with those imported Americans The Internecine Project was a British-West German co-production, and looked resolutely European in spite of Coburn and Grant taking the leads. He applied his accustomed intelligence to an ideal role, though his character didn't take part in any action sequences or similar, while we wonder if she is a red herring or knows more than she is letting on, and they were supported by a fine selection of British thesps such as a woman-hating Harry Andrews and an ineffectual Ian Hendry, with German import Christiane Krüger taking care of the glamour. It all goes swimmingly as a thriller - until the ending, which quite frankly is silly and should have been changed. Groovy music by Roy Budd.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1978 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: