HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  In Their Sleep She Drove All Night
Year: 2010
Director: Caroline du Potet, Éric du Potet
Stars: Anne Parillaud, Arthur Dupont, Thierry Frémont, Jean-Hugues Anglade
Genre: Horror, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: A year ago, Sarah (Anne Parillaud) had moved out to the countryside with her husband and teenage son for a break from the rat race, thinking the bucolic idyll would supply some peace of mind. Alas, her son was not so pleased with the situation and complained bitterly about ending up in the middle of nowhere, though her husband said he would get used to it eventually. So when the boy was meant to be studying for his exams, he tired of the cramming and went downstairs, announcing he was going out for an hour. When his parents forbade him, he returned to his room and unbeknownst to them tried to sneak out of the window...

That's where a rather absurd accident befalls him as he loses his footing and ends up impaled on some spikes which happened to be down below the window, and we jump forward to the year later where Sarah's husband (played by Jean-Hugues Anglade in a brief nod to their pairing in Nikita) has long ago left her to gradually crack up alone. She has a job in a hospital, but in her choice to lose herself in her work to forget about her tragedy she has taken on so many of her colleagues' tasks that her health is suffering nonetheless and on the night the rest of the plot takes place, she has been sent home to rest.

This is where she meets the other main character who appeals to her bruised maternal instincts, a young man called Arthur who she runs into on the way back to her house. No, really, she literally runs into him with her car, though it was his own stupid fault for leaping out in front of her from the darkness of the undegrowth. Feeling that old guilt re-emerging, she picks him up and puts him in her car, and it is at this point where you have to make a choice whether to believe everything you see or not, because In Their Sleep was one of those movies where there was a twist with the perception, which meant the way the first half hour played was not necessarily going to be the way the rest of it did.

In that fashion, this was a sort of Funny Games lite, as not only were there those accumulations of scenes to put different spins on what you had already seen, there were also variations on those scenes which in practice meant there were two endings you could choose from. Given the film opens with a shot of Sarah lying in a field with ants crawling over her, that could well be an indication of what her eventual fate was, though from that introduction you don't know whether she is alive or dead: the following plot will help you make up your mind, but you can be assured whatever state she is in she has not had a very good night. Which actually renders it a lot less surprising than you might expect.

Or might have been intended, for that matter. In Their Sleep, or Dans ton sommeil as it was known originally, was one of that twenty-first century new wave of horrors out of France, and while not as extreme as some of its fellows it did contain some rather grim shots, concerning as it did as a major plot point the wiping out of a whole family. Sister and brother directing double act Caroline du Potet and Éric du Potet made a debut which could be described as confident, certainly in their staging of suspense, but their script needed a little work as you could observe this was a lot less shocking than they seemed to think it was thanks to it not really doing enough with the home invasion notion than could have been the case: contrast it with its equally Gallic contemporary Inside and you would see how much could be done with a simple premise if the filmmakers were willing to really go nuts with their ideas. Nevertherless, this did not outstay its welcome with a running time barely eighty minutes long, though a final attempt at poetry was a step too far. Music by Éric Neveux.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1743 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
  Louise Hackett
Darren Jones
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: