HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Morfalous, Les
Dreambuilders
Everything Went Fine
Lux AEterna
Rum Runners
Fairy and the Devil, The
Mad God
Outside the Law
I Remember Mama
Superman Unbound
Lawrence of Belgravia
House Across the Lake, The
Wonder Park
Hornsby e Rodriguez
Operation Mincemeat
5 Kung Fu Daredevil Heroes
Scoob!
Earwig
Offseason
Peau Douce, La
Double Indemnity
Na Cha and the Seven Devils
Deep Murder
Superman vs. the Elite
Adam Project, The
Osamu Tezuka's Last Mystery of the 20th Century
Horse, La
Buffaloed
Train Robbers, The
Let Sleeping Cops Lie
Abominable
Funeral, The
Burning Sea, The
Godzilla Singular Point
Ace of Aces
Innocents, The
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Flight of the Doves Escape To The Emerald Isle
Year: 1971
Director: Ralph Nelson
Stars: Ron Moody, Jack Wild, Dorothy McGuire, Stanley Holloway, Helen Raye, William Rushton, Dana, John Molloy, Barry Keegan, Brendan O'Reilly, Noel Purcell, Tom Hickey, Niall Tobin
Genre: AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Finn Dove (Jack Wild) is a thirteen-year-old boy who lives with his stepfather Tobias Cromwell (William Rushton), but more importantly has to look after his younger sister Derval (Helen Raye) whose youthful optimism is sorely tested by their conditions. Cromwell is their sole guardian now their mother has died, but they dream of visiting Ireland and leaving England far behind, hoping that they can unite with their grandmother (Dorothy McGuire) in her little thatched cottage on the west coast of the country. After Cromwell smashes the gift Finn brings Derval, it's the final straw, and they plan to run away...

It's safe to say Lemony Snicket was taking notes when he watched Flight of the Doves, a British family adventure set and filmed in Ireland, and oddly the project director Ralph Nelson chose to follow up his controversially violent Western Soldier Blue. The plot was basic, episodic even, as it concentrated on the two kids and their escape from not only their dull-witted but cruel stepfather, but also the real star turn here, which was Ron Moody as their evil uncle Hawk Dove. He is an actor, just as Jim Carrey played in A Series of Unfortunate Events, adopting a series of disguises in his attempts to track down his nephew and niece, though with a giveaway tattoo on his wrist.

We're told he almost killed a man once, and his first scene shows him essaying the roles of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde to nobody's interest until he flies off the stage in a fury and starts throwing things about, but if or when he catches up with the kids we are aware there will be no almost about it, he wants them dead. This is because they are due a huge inheritance (for 1971) and if they are out of the way he can claim it for himself, but he has to be careful and not throw suspicion his way, hence the array of disguises he dreams up, which not coincidentally allow Moody to show of his considerable range as a seasoned character actor, a better one that the person he is playing, oddly.

This varied approach to the villainous role offered something that bit more special than the usual pantomime that Flight of the Doves could have been, no matter how broad Moody played it we could still discern this was the man who had dazzled us all as Fagin in the blockbusting British musical of the sixties Oliver! which had also made a star of Wild. He was beginning his slow descent into sorry alcoholism by this stage in his career, an all-too well publcised fall from grace which made Wild's fans only feel their hearts go out to him all the more. This left a work such as this, where he was actually an adult but short and baby-faced enough to pass for a younger teenager, more precious to those who felt protective towards the unhappy star.

It was an eclectic cast, for once the children reach Ireland, stowing away on the ferry as money is tight, a selection of fairly famous faces awaited them, including as a "tinker" (their word) Eurovision Song Contest winner of the previous year and future politician Dana who is coaxed into giving us a tune which she sings in Gaelic. Stanley Holloway made one of his last appearances as the judge who may be an obstacle to the children's ultimate happiness, but then just as likely could offer them the contentment they need, but it was watching Moody weasel his way into the lives of those concerned about them that was the most enteraining, he truly made for a devious and resourceful bad guy. The schmaltzy message that little Derval was the one they should all be looking after since she really needs to be loved was not laid on as thickly as might have been expected, as Nelson preferred to highlight the narrow scrapes with seemingly the whole of the island searching for the heroes, though there was still time for an infernally catchy musical number cheerily stressing the friendliness of Ireland. Music by Roy Budd.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5375 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: