HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Shakedown Law And Disorder
Year: 1988
Director: James Glickenhaus
Stars: Peter Weller, Sam Elliott, Patricia Charbonneau, Antonio Fargas, Richard Brooks, Blanche Baker, Jude Ciccolella, Larry Joshua, Thomas G. Waites, Daryl Edwards, John C. McGinley, Walter Bobbie, David Proval, Harold Perrineau, Shirley Stoler, Paul Bartel
Genre: Action, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: One night in New York City a drug dealer was standing around in the park waiting for customers and listening to a rap cassette on his ghetto blaster when a man approached him and asked for something, but what happened after that only the dealer, Michael Jones (Richard Brooks), knows for soon they are both lying on the ground, with the would-be customer now dead of a gunshot wound. Jones claims the man was an undercover cop and he was about to murder him before he managed to pull his gun first, but seeing as how the victim really was a cop, it's not looking good for the accused...

Shakedown was also known as Blue Jean Cop and the titles are interchangeable depending on what territory you were in, but the film remained much the same, a tough police thriller on the surface which grew increasingly bizarre as director James Glickenhaus, himself no stranger to heading straight over the top when it came to his action sequences, grabbed his plot by the scruff of the neck and gave it an almighty shake so that by the finale you were wondering if they were really trying to get away with what they seemed to be attempting. One thing was for sure, there weren't many action movies that ridiculous.

Well, there were, but few which appeared to be more like one of those nineteen-seventies police dramas until it all went crazy. There were two main characters presented in a manner that suggested Glickenhaus would have preferred to create one supercop-lawyer rather than a separate couple, but as it was we had Peter Weller as Roland Dalton, hotshot attorney living with rich girlfriend Gail (Blanche Baker) who takes on Jones's case, and Sam Elliott as undercover man Richie Marks, a world-weary detective who is more able than he first appears. The sound of his sob story about accidentally killing his ideal woman's dog (stolen for a British lager advert the next year) is another hint this is not a sensible movie.

Glickenhaus obviously loved New York City, with particular preference for Times Square and its grindhouses as he even has one of the theatres playing his movies, which Marks is sleeping through when we meet him (perhaps not a great endorsement). Not only that, but there was a big setpiece staged there; as with the other such scenes, the stuntwork was exemplary, but the believability angle is neglected as you can't imagine the cop getting away with this never mind the lawyer he takes along with him. With courtroom battles between Dalton and Patricia Charbonneau as D.A. Susan Cantrell, who he happens to be sleeping with behind Gail's back, Shakedown was all over the place.

Yet it didn't come across that way for much of the time, not up until the stage where, say, Elliott pursues a suspect to the top of a rollercoaster which proceeds to malfunction and the carriages fly off the rails with the bad guy inside: you didn't get business like that when Paul Newman was tackling his case in The Verdict or when Charles Laughton was trying to concentrate on Witness for the Prosecution, did you? More's the pity, some might say, but this was very silly stuff which entertained up to a point, and that point was when you started to laugh. For the grand finale, which was nothing if not memorable, Elliott found himself trying to shoot down a plane in flight while hanging onto the wheel, a situation which only grew more preposterous as it developed. Oh well, the cast was a good one even if they were playing cartoon characters, with Antonio Fargas and Larry Joshua making for an excellent pair of villains, though Weller's endorsement of Jimi Hendrix could have been more convincing. Music by Jonathan Elias.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3396 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: