HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
Diana's Wedding
Deerskin
Toll, The
Two of Us
Nowhere Special
Rainbow Jacket, The
Crazy Samurai: 400 vs 1
First Cow
Undiscovered Tomb
Being Frank
Occupation: Rainfall
Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc
Pariah
Weapon, The
Godzilla vs. Kong
Love and Monsters
Tove
Young Wives' Tale
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  Charley One-Eye A Game Of Chicken
Year: 1973
Director: Don Chaffey
Stars: Richard Roundtree, Roy Thinnes, Nigel Davenport, Jill Pearson, Aldo Sambrell, Luis Aller, Rafael Albaicín
Genre: WesternBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: During the American Civil War, this man (Richard Roundtree) has deserted from the Union Army after a controversy involving him having an affair with an officer's wife put a price on his head, though the fact that he has now murdered the man he cuckolded has not helped matters one bit, and neither does the matter of him being black and the wife being white. He wanders the desert scavenging food when he can, even grabbing it from the mouths of stray dogs, when he happens to stumble across an Indian (Roy Thinnes) who is out here alone...

That's right, blue eyed Roy Thinnes was playing an Indian, and not even one of those so-called "half-breeds" Westerns were so fond of featuring around this time. But it got stranger, for Charley One-Eye was that rare thing, a British Western: when the most famous of those was Carry On Cowboy, you'd be aware this was not a genre the British Isles were entirely comfortable with, no matter how popular they had been there down the decades. Must have been something to do with the climate and the landscape that the most the United Kingdom could do to create a desert setting was to drive the cast to the nearest beach and hope for the best.

There was an alternative option available to British producers and that was the one also available to the rest of Europe, which was to toddle off to Spain and film in the deserts there, which was precisely what the makers of this did. Yet even stranger than that was the executive producer behind this was none other than international gadabout and celebrity interviewer David Frost, for whose Paradine Productions this was created. Now, given the incendiary message about the white man needing to be overthrown by the downtrodden black and American Indian, you have to wonder what was going on in Frostie's head when he commissioned this little item.

Certainly he had been involved with political entertainments before, but according to this he was itching to join the Black Panthers. Roundtree and Thinnes to their credit offered up some surprisingly decent performances, the latter especially losing himself under this makeup and costume for the barely intelligible Indian - no one in this story received a name, incidentally, apparently to render their experience all the more universal in the screenplay penned by Keith Leonard (whose only other major credit was to invent sugary sitcom Me and My Girl for primetime ITV). While director Don Chaffey maintained a hardnosed, gritty and edgy appearance in the dust and blazing sunshine, the cast set about living up to it.

At first the black man orders the crippled Indian about, demanding he make food for him, give him water, and so on, though they see eye to eye when they twig that they share an antagonist, which is the racist, ruling white man. Roundtree relished the dialogue about looking forward to killing as many whites as he could (it seems to be the main reason he was in the army) while Thinnes becomes preoccupied with the chickens they find belonging to a dead traveller. Actually, to say no one got a name here is wrong, as the title belonged to one of those chickens, though quite the symbolism of that was even harder to fathom than what we were meant to take away from this other than David Frost encouraging us to kill whitey. Representing all that is racist and vile about Caucasians, bounty hunter Nigel Davenport showed up to be beastly to the other two, and it was true you get very uncomfortable when he is onscreen, deliberately so, though the parable as a whole was bemusing at best. Funky music by John Cameron.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3014 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Don Chaffey  (1917 - 1990)

British director best known for directing fantasy favourites Jason and the Argonauts and One Million Years B.C, both of which featured groundbreaking Ray Harryhausen effects. Chaffey also directed Hammer's Viking Queen, but much of his work was in television, both in the UK (The Prisoner, Man In a Suitcase) and, later, the US (Charlie's Angels, CHiPs, Airwolf). Also made kids' favourites Greyfriars Bobby and Pete's Dragon for Disney.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: