HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Cicada
Sun Shines Bright, The
Last Thing Mary Saw, The
Comets
Herself
Mon Oncle d'Amerique
Wild Strawberries
Runner, The
Don't Look Up
Ghostbusters: Afterlife
Eternals
Forever Purge, The
Memoria
Venom: Let There Be Carnage
Legend of La Llorona, The
Japon
Glasshouse
Perdita Durango
Commando, The
Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror
Boiling Point
Malignant
Deadly Games
Ailey
Voyeurs, The
Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes
In the Earth
Hiroshima Mon Amour
Hotel Poseidon
Zola
No Time to Die
Klaus
Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey
Candyman
Power of the Dog, The
StageFright
Voyage of Time: An IMAX Documentary
Suicide Squad, The
One Night in Miami...
Old
   
 
Newest Articles
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
Vestron Double Bill: Dementia 13 and The Wraith
Farewell Dean Stockwell: His Years of Weirdness
Kung Fu Craft: Cinematic Vengeance! on Blu-ray
999 Letsbe Avenue: Gideon's Way on Blu-ray
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
   
 
  CQ What Happens In The End?
Year: 2002
Director: Roman Coppola
Stars: Jeremy Davies, Angela Lindvall, Elodie Bouchez, Gérard Depardieu, Billy Zane, Massimo Ghini, Giancarlo Giannini, John Phillip Law, Jason Schwartzman, Dean Stockwell, L.M. Kit Carson, Sofia Coppola
Genre: Drama, Romance, WeirdoBuy from Amazon
Rating:  8 (from 2 votes)
Review: It's Christmas 1969 and film editor Paul Ballard (Jeremy Davies) is working on a science fiction romp called Codename Dragonfly in Paris. While he does that, he is "borrowing" film to shoot his own black and white documentary about his life; meanwhile, when the director of the sci-fi adventure, Andrejez (Gerard Depardieu) shows the producer Enzo (Giancarlo Giannini) what he's come up with, Enzo is furious. Andrejez wants to end the film not with a bang, but with a whimper, but Enzo wants action, action, and more action. Andrejez is sacked, and a chain of events begins that sees Paul become the director of Codename Dragonfly - but he has no idea how to end the movie.

Written by the director Roman Coppola, CQ is a film steeped in film culture, packed with references and homage. Paul can only relate to life through films, as he single-mindedly details his everyday thoughts through his camera. His stewardess girlfriend Marlene (Elodie Bouchez) points out early on that, he may think its a good idea to find meaning in the day to day happenings of his existence, "but what if it's boring?" He conducts imaginary interviews with himself while sitting on the toilet, and becomes more and more introspective, so that his girlfriend is alienated and his grasp on reality, triggered by Codename Dragonfly, is weakened.

The fantasy film within a film is a lovingly recreated rendering of all those campy, European adventures like Barbarella, Danger: Diabolik (John Phillip Law plays a role here), The Tenth Victim and Modesty Blaise. Dragonfly, played by Valentine, played by Angela Lindvall, is a glamorous superspy from the year 2001, called on to steal back a secret weapon from a group of revolutionaries (led by Billy Zane) whose base is on the moon. In truth, although beautifully done, Dragonfly doesn't look as if it would last over twenty minutes, never mind stretch to a full length feature, and doesn't quite bear the weight that Paul (or Coppola) places on it.

The first choice for director after Andrejez is Felix (the excellent Jason Schwartzman), an over-enthusiastic boy wonder who is unexpectedly injured in a car crash after finishing his vampire epic. Then, the editing room is sabotaged, and Paul suspects that the passionate Andrejez is trying to scupper the film, thinking if he can't make it, no one can. Art imitates life in CQ, where the revolutionary ideals of Andrejez inform Dragonfly's storyline, and Paul's girlfriend troubles and retreat from life into movies make their way into the fiction, too.

Obviously the work of a man who is infatuated with film, CQ frequently sees Paul obsessively editing, shooting or simply stroking his new handheld camera. This is its strength and weakness: if you like the 60s movies Coppola references, and if you enjoy behind the scenes gossip, then you'll warm to CQ, but like its dazed protagonist, it's so wrapped up in the film world that you feel as distant from Paul as his girlfriend does. Everything in life goes to feed the movies, and fantasy and reality blur, with Paul carrying out conversations with the fictional character even as he falls for Valentine. The nicely dreamlike result is charming to look at, with a fine reconstruction of the late sixties, but is too self-absorbed as a whole. Real life, boring or not, doesn't get much of a look in, which, I suppose, fits the mood. Music by Mellow.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 6335 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Roman Coppola  (1965 - )

The son of Francis Ford Coppola, Roman, like his sister Sofia Coppola, continued in the family business, at first by working behind the scenes for his father on such films as Rumble Fish, The Outsiders and Bram Stoker's Dracula. He became known as a talented director of music videos, notably for the Strokes, before making his feature debut with CQ, a love letter to cinema. He is the cousin of Nicolas Cage and Jason Schwartzman.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: