HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Nest, The
Martin Eden
Halloween Kills
Cicada
Sun Shines Bright, The
Last Thing Mary Saw, The
Comets
Herself
Mon Oncle d'Amerique
Wild Strawberries
Runner, The
Don't Look Up
Ghostbusters: Afterlife
Eternals
Forever Purge, The
Memoria
Venom: Let There Be Carnage
Legend of La Llorona, The
Japon
Glasshouse
Perdita Durango
Commando, The
Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror
Boiling Point
Malignant
Deadly Games
Ailey
Voyeurs, The
Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes
In the Earth
Hiroshima Mon Amour
Hotel Poseidon
Zola
No Time to Die
Klaus
Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey
Candyman
Power of the Dog, The
StageFright
Voyage of Time: An IMAX Documentary
   
 
Newest Articles
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
Vestron Double Bill: Dementia 13 and The Wraith
Farewell Dean Stockwell: His Years of Weirdness
Kung Fu Craft: Cinematic Vengeance! on Blu-ray
999 Letsbe Avenue: Gideon's Way on Blu-ray
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
   
 
  While You Were Sleeping Lonely Girl
Year: 1995
Director: John Turteltaub
Stars: Sandra Bullock, Bill Pullman, Peter Gallagher, Peter Boyle, Jack Warden, Glynis Johns, Midge Mercurio, Jason Bernard, Michael Rispoli, Ally Walker, Monica Keena, Ruth Rudnick, Marcia Wright, Dick Cusack, Thomas Q. Morris, Bernie Landis
Genre: Comedy, RomanceBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: Lucy (Sandra Bullock) lives a lonely existence as a token collector on the Chicago transit system, but someone brightens her day every time she sees him, and that's the commuter (Peter Gallagher) who passes through the station every morning. She wishes she could pluck up the courage to speak to him, but he has barely noticed her, although with Christmas arriving the next day he does wish her a merry one, yet she is too flustered to return the good wishes. Then something extraordinary happens: he is mugged and lands unconscious on the tracks, so Lucy springs into action.

Most of the reaction to While You Were Sleeping revolved around the star quality of the then-new celebrity Sandra Bullock, for whom this was one of the first movies she got to headline. Obviously being a female star she just had to do a romantic comedy, but while that genre is often viewed as a disposable way to spend an hour and a half without much thought, in this case there was something about the way it went beyond the admittedly farfetched premise and actually turned surprisingly touching. A lot of that was due to Bullock, and the way in which both script and supporting cast allowed her to shine in a role that could have seemed simply desperate.

That premise was that when Lucy saved the man she admired from afar, who it turns out is called Peter, she accompanied him to the hospital as he lay in a coma, and the nurse overhears her muttering that he should be the man she marries. The nurse gets the wrong end of the stick, and when the family arrive she tells them Lucy is Peter's fiancee, which they're all taken aback about seeing as how they never heard of her before, but hearing how she rescued him they're only too pleased to welcome her into their fold. Knowing the granny (Glynis Johns) has a heart condition, Lucy cannot risk her health by coming clean, and so begins an elaborate web of fibs.

It's a high concept that could have been the cue for any number of embarrassing crossed purposes and deceptions, but the script by Daniel G. Sullivan and Frederic LeBow resisted going in any more outlandish directions than it really needed to. Thus things were kept low key, even gentle, with only the odd moment of more forced humour, leaving room for the romance and inclusiveness of Peter's family to take over. Lucy lost both her parents and doesn't really have any close friends, so part of what makes her relcutant to admit the truth is that she truly enjoys being part of such a nice group of people, and there's a sadness to Bullock's portrayal that endears her to us.

To complicate things, Peter has a brother Jack, played by Bill Pullman, not the obvious romcom lead and all the better for it as Lucy and Jack fall for each other, but are put into a position by circumstances partly her fault that they cannot tell one another how they really feel. Along with those family themes was the familiar one in this style that nobody can say what they actually mean, and risk a life of unhappiness as a result unless what's on their minds can be spoken. Bullock and Pullman deftly depicted these as Peter lies in his coma (Gallagher must have thought this a pretty easy job), but he's not going to stay like that forever, and the question looms what will Lucy do when he wakes up and has no idea of who she is, never mind what she is doing there. Which is quite amusing, and if this wasn't uproarious it was sweet and entertaining in its dilemmas, especially considering how crass it could have been in less sympathetic hands. Sugary music, which could have been better, by Randy Edelman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2375 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: