HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Batman: The Long Halloween Part Two
Psychic, The
Brief Encounter
Boys from County Hell
All Hands On Deck
Teddy
Beasts Clawing at Straws
Summer of Soul (...Or, When the Revolution Could Not Be Televised)
Windom's Way
True Don Quixote, The
Babymother
Mitchells vs. the Machines, The
Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Unholy, The
How to Deter a Robber
Antebellum
Offering, The
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
   
 
Newest Articles
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
   
 
  Deliverance This Is The Weekend They Didn't Play Golf
Year: 1972
Director: John Boorman
Stars: Jon Voight, Burt Reynolds, Ned Beatty, Ronny Cox, Ed Ramey, Billy Redden, Seamon Glass, Randall Deal, Bill McKinney, Herbert 'Cowboy' Coward, Lewis Crone, Ken Keener, Johnny Popwell, John Fowler, Kathy Rickman, Louise Coldren, James Dickey
Genre: Thriller, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Normally these four friends would be playing golf during their usual get togethers, but this weekend things are different. The most macho of them, Lewis (Burt Reynolds) wanted to ride the rapids of this river far from their Atlanta home, mainly because he wished to experience it before the valley was flooded for a new dam project and the landscape was lost forever beneath the water. But when they get there, Ed (Jon Voight) is having reservations at the distinct lack of a friendly welcome they get from what few locals they meet - he doesn't know the half of it...

Deliverance was one of those movies with such a shocking scene that it passed into legend, simultaneously making a joke of the idea of straying from the path in isolated areas and tapping into a very real fear that many had that should they take that camping trip in the middle of nowhere, civilisation would turn its back and allow all sorts of heinous crimes to be perpetrated. James Dickey was the man who thought this up, and if it shared a similar unease with simple country folk as Straw Dogs, this effort went deeper than the Sam Peckinpah movie to become part of modern parlance.

Basically this was either an act of defamation against the population of the North American wilderness, or a method of backing up every worry townies ever had about the place. Yet while the landscape is a major part of what made this environment so unfriendly, it was really the human aspect that proved the most troublesome, and that notion that the more lonely the situation, the less likely that the laws of the nation would apply. That shock sequence which brings it home is almost folklore itself, as if the film was based on a true incident - it wasn't - and what follows after keeps the tension at a maximum.

Seemingly the moment Drew (Ronny Cox) duels musically with the mountain boy who turns away from him after showing himself to be the superior banjo player, the four friends' fate is sealed, no matter how bluff Lewis (in the role that made Reynolds THE Hollywood star of the decade) is in the face of grumpy locals. Every one of those men have something to lose, and they do lose it over the course of the story, some kind of violation that either sees them the victim or forced into acts they would have thought unimaginable the day before. Once they hit the river in their twin canoes, all bets are off and anything can happen to them - as long as it's something harrowing.

Deliverance was well enough made to make it indelible in the fabric of cinema, after all there were a slew of horror movies that followed on that took their cue from it, from The Texas Chain Saw Massacre to Friday the 13th and beyond, yet it was not quite at the level of excellence that saw it eschew a pretentiousness which held it back. Indeed, you may wonder what Dickey and director John Boorman were trying to say other than a stick to the path Grimm's Fairy Tales moral, as when you looked into its themes they became murky and confused, as if holding back the visceral power of its finer scenes. Even the ending, where the amateur adventurers meet other mountain folk who could not be friendlier, suggests bad luck rather than a chasm of immorality in men's souls was to blame for the nightmare they have been through. The fact you cannot come up with a logical explanation for what happened is part of that power of course, the paranoia that it could happen to you, but the sense of a punch to the gut by someone who then intellectualises over it never leaves this.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3753 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

John Boorman  (1933 - )

British director whose work can be insufferably pretentious or completely inspired, sometimes in the space of a single film. He began his career with the BBC, before directing Dave Clark Five vehicle Catch Us If You Can. Hollywood beckoned and his Lee Marvin movies Point Blank and Hell in the Pacific won him admirers.

From then on the quality was variable: the obscure Leo the Last, the harrowing megahit Deliverance, the ridiculous Zardoz, the reviled Exorcist II, Arthurian adaptation Excalibur, The Emerald Forest, Where the Heart Is, The General and underrated spy drama The Tailor of Panama. Was once involved with an aborted attempt to film The Lord of the Rings.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: