HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
End of Summer
Times of Harvey Milk, The
Buddies
Threshold
Perfectly Normal Family, A
Ravage
Honeymoon Phase, The
One Summer
Bird Island
Variety
Devil to Pay, The
Gypsy
Lost in London
Divorce Italian Style
Becky
Salon Kitty
Misbehaviour
Charles, Dead or Alive
Gretel and Hansel
Mademoiselle
Tunnel, The
India Song
Last Rhino, The
Made in Hong Kong
Ring of Spies
Rom Boys: 40 Years of Rad
Pocketful of Miracles
The Tomb: Devil's Revenge
Sidecar Racers
Space Dogs
Out/Marriage
Safety Last!
Bride Who Has Returned from Hell, The
Show Boat
Savage
City Called Dragon, A
I Used to Go Here
Six Suspects
Still the Water
Not Now, Comrade
   
 
Newest Articles
A Knock on the Door at 4 O'clock in the Morning: The Strangers on Blu-ray
Wives of the Skies: Honey Lauren Interview
To Catch a Thief: After the Fox on Blu-ray
Tackling the Football Film: The Arsenal Stadium Mystery on Blu-ray
Film Noir's Golden Couple: This Gun for Hire on Blu-ray
The Doctor Who Connection: Invasion on Blu-ray
Hill's Angles: Benny Hill and Who Done It? on Blu-ray
Big Willie Style: Keep It Up Downstairs on Blu-ray
Walt's Vault: 5 Cult Movies on Disney+
Paradise Lost: Walkabout on Blu-ray
Buster Makes Us Feel Good: Buster Keaton - 3 Films (Volume 3) on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 3 - Don't Go Away - I Could Do with a Bit of Cheer Now!
What Use is Grief to a Horse? Equus on Blu-ray
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
   
 
  Frankenstein and the Monster from Hell You Can't Get The Parts These Days
Year: 1973
Director: Terence Fisher
Stars: Peter Cushing, Shane Briant, Madeline Smith, David Prowse, John Stratton, Charles Lloyd Pack, Bernard Lee, Patrick Troughton, Philip Voss, Chris Cunningham
Genre: Horror, HistoricalBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Dr Simon Helder (Shane Briant) is arrested after performing experiments on recently dead bodies stolen from the local graveyard, and is sent to an asylum for the criminally insane for five years. When he gets there, he discovers that the place is being run in secret by Baron Victor Frankenstein (Peter Cushing) who has been believed dead but is in fact continuing his experiments on the inmates...

After the failed comedy style of Horror of Frankenstein, this instalment looked like a reunion of the old Hammer team. Written by Anthony Hinds under his John Elder pseudonym, Hammer coaxed Terence Fisher out of retirement, and Peter Cushing returned in the role that made him famous. However, the nostalgia behind the scenes didn't translate to the screen, and the end result, the last Hammer Frankenstein, was a grey, drab and forlorn effort.

Although chiefly a retread of past glories, the film isn't a dead loss. Cushing's Baron is as icily villainous as ever, with his clipped diction, matter of fact references to "homicidal tendencies" and the like, and drive for scientific breakthroughs at any cost and with no sense of morality. As the film progresses, Helder changes from being his willing disciple to a sickened bystander, thoroughly repulsed by what he had earlier embraced as pioneering. By the end, Frankenstein has become a hopeless case and the asylum is the best place for him.

There are plenty of pathetic souls in the institution; one nice aspect of the production is that every inmate has their own quirks, even the extras. As the prison doctor, the Baron first conveys a sensitivity towards the unfortunates, but it's not long before he's betraying them by exploiting their bodies for his experiments. A lumbering brute who attempts suicide becomes the vessel for artistic hands and the brain of a genius - in Frankenstein's world, talent and skill reside in body parts and God is an irrelevance.

Naturally, it all goes wrong, with the Baron's vile plans for breeding his monster with a mute servant girl (Madeline Smith) amounting to nothing when the creature goes on a rampage. This predictability does nothing to help the film, but the odd item of black humour, such as the Baron accidentally stepping on a discarded brain, helps offset the grottiness of the gore scenes and piteous characters. Not the the best way to end a horror icon's career, but even the film agrees that Frankenstein's time, in this incarnation at least, had passed. Music by James Bernard (of course).
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 6208 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: