HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Bird Island
Variety
Devil to Pay, The
Gypsy
Lost in London
Divorce Italian Style
Becky
Salon Kitty
Misbehaviour
Charles, Dead or Alive
Gretel and Hansel
Mademoiselle
Tunnel, The
India Song
Last Rhino, The
Made in Hong Kong
Ring of Spies
Rom Boys: 40 Years of Rad
Pocketful of Miracles
The Tomb: Devil's Revenge
Sidecar Racers
Space Dogs
Out/Marriage
Safety Last!
Bride Who Has Returned from Hell, The
Show Boat
Savage
City Called Dragon, A
I Used to Go Here
Six Suspects
Still the Water
Not Now, Comrade
I'm Thinking of Ending Things
Wives of the Skies
Two Heads Creek
Next Stop, Greenwich Village
Captain, The
Great Wall, A
Trout, The
Zorba the Greek
   
 
Newest Articles
A Knock on the Door at 4 O'clock in the Morning: The Strangers on Blu-ray
Wives of the Skies: Honey Lauren Interview
To Catch a Thief: After the Fox on Blu-ray
Tackling the Football Film: The Arsenal Stadium Mystery on Blu-ray
Film Noir's Golden Couple: This Gun for Hire on Blu-ray
The Doctor Who Connection: Invasion on Blu-ray
Hill's Angles: Benny Hill and Who Done It? on Blu-ray
Big Willie Style: Keep It Up Downstairs on Blu-ray
Walt's Vault: 5 Cult Movies on Disney+
Paradise Lost: Walkabout on Blu-ray
Buster Makes Us Feel Good: Buster Keaton - 3 Films (Volume 3) on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 3 - Don't Go Away - I Could Do with a Bit of Cheer Now!
What Use is Grief to a Horse? Equus on Blu-ray
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
   
 
  Breakfast on Pluto More Than A Woman
Year: 2005
Director: Neil Jordan
Stars: Cillian Murphy, Stephen Rea, Brendan Gleeson, Liam Neeson, Eva Birthistle, Liam Cunningham, Bryan Ferry, Gavin Friday, Ian Hart, Laurence Kinlan, Ruth McCabe, Ruth Negga, Steven Waddington, Patrick McCabe, Dominic Cooper
Genre: Comedy, DramaBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: When Patrick Braden (Cillian Murphy) was a baby, he was left on the steps of the village's priest (Liam Neeson), his parents unknown, except that everyone had a pretty good idea that the priest was the father and his housekeeper was the mother. As he grew up, the only thing that Patrick knew about her was that she looked like the musical star Mitzi Gaynor, and he made it his life's work to track her down. Before that, however, he had some growing up to do, and marked himself out as a misfit who liked to dress in his adoptive mother's clothes: for some reason, Patrick tended to rub certain people up the wrong way...

Based on Patrick McCabe's novel, Breakfast on Pluto was one of director Neil Jordan's Irish films, made when he wasn't gallivanting around Hollywood and apparently with more to say about his background than the likes of The Brave One or In Dreams. He certainly displayed a keener sense of place in this particular effort, with its witty sketching of small town Ireland in the sixties and seventies, although he didn't stay there as Patrick moves to London as part of his search. Divided into thirty-six brief chapters, the story follows the main character now naming himself Kitten, and examines his inability to take anything as seriously as those around him try to force him to do.

Well, he does take one thing seriously, and that's his absent mother, but even that isn't going to make him man up and have a good hard look at his life and the way he is living it. If it were not for his quest you get the impression that he would still be wandering around as much as he does, only with even less sense of purpose than he already has, and in truth the meandering narrative was probably more successful on the page than it is as a film, with characters popping up only to be disposed off ten minutes later, and the ones who do appear more than once or twice tend to be outshone by the glare of Kitten's personality. This is where Murphy makes the film his own, with his fluttering eyelashes and breathy voice somehow not quite rendering the whole enterprise as outright camp.

That in spite of tussles with both sides of the Northern Irish Troubles, as not only does he get into problems with the I.R.A. when he flings a stash of their weapons into a lake in a fit of pique (well, a bomb had killed one of his childhood friends), but also gets arrested by the London police who think the explosion set off to kill British soldiers in a nightclub was planted by him. He approaches these violent men in exactly the same way, not quite laughing in their faces, but nevertheless undercutting their aggression with humour and fey reactions, all this in spite of the threat of injury or death. You can see why Kitten would incense so many people, but also his point that the best way to confront his life's harsher truths is not to let them get to him: "Why so serious?" could be his catchphrase.

As if giving in to Kitten's outlook, there are some very funny moments in Breakfast on Pluto, especially when Brendan Gleeson shows up as a perpetually enraged children's entertainer, dressed up as a Womble and barking out The Wombling Song as he gets Kitten a job in the theme park he works in. But there are just as many parts which you worry for Patrick's safety as he barely seems able to look after himself: the society he is in is not as forgiving as he is, so Bryan Ferry shows up as a kerb crawler who almost succeeds in killing him off for good. But Kitten is more resilient than he appears, as summed up by the sequences where he endures being Stephen Rea's magician's assistant and emerges beaming from every predicament he is placed in. Only at the end does he allow himself to shed a tear when he finally encounters his mother, but in a film that is too long, you may have lost interest as you begin to urge them to get on with it and besides, his search for identity isn't a narrative success when he already has his personality set in stone. Music by Anna Jordan, along with a multitude of seventies hits.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2550 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: