HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Green Knight, The
Beasts of No Nation
One of Our Aircraft is Missing
Picture Stories
Another Round
Tape, The
Limbo
Supernova
Man Who Sold His Skin, The
Sweetheart
No Man of God
Gaia
Oliver Sacks: His Own Life
Scenes with Beans
Sweat
Quiet Place Part II, A
Nobody
Prisoners of the Ghostland
Duel to the Death
Mandibles
Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands
Yakuza Princess
Djinn, The
New Order
Triggered
Claw
Original Cast Album: Company
Martyrs Lane
Paper Tigers, The
Conjuring: The Devil Made Me Do It, The
Hall
ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt, The
Collini Case, The
Hitman's Wife's Bodyguard
Snake Girl and the Silver-Haired Witch, The
Superhost
Plan A
When I'm a Moth
Tigers Are Not Afraid
Misha and the Wolves
   
 
Newest Articles
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
70s Sitcom Dads: Bless This House and Father Dear Father on Blu-ray
Going Under: Deep Cover on Blu-ray
Child's Play: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 3 on DVD
Poetry and Motion: Great Noises That Fill the Air on DVD
Too Much to Bear: Prophecy on Blu-ray
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
   
 
  Went the Day Well? The Invaders
Year: 1942
Director: Alberto Cavalcanti
Stars: Leslie Banks, Basil Sydney, Valerie Taylor, David Farrar, C.V. France, Marie Lohr, Harry Fowler, Frank Lawton, Edward Rigby, Elizabeth Allan, Thora Hird, Norman Pierce, Mervyn Johns, Johnnie Schofield, Patricia Hayes, Muriel George, Ellis Irving
Genre: WarBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: Remember when Britain was invaded by the Germans during World War II? You might not be aware of it, but there is a memorial to those who fell in combat in the village of Bramley End where the event occured, and here is the story of what happened as one Saturday near the end of May some British troops entered the boundaries and announced to the villagers that the army was to stage some manoeuvres there, although it would not go much past that weekend. However, these soldiers were not British at all, but Germans in disguise, the spearhead of an invasion which they had been long planning...

Well, apart from the Channel Islands, Britain wasn't invaded by the Nazis during the Second World War, but Went the Day Well? was a propaganda item drawn from a Graham Greene story designed to prepare the United Kingdom's public for what might have happened should Adolf Hitler have decided to pursue this particular line of conquest. By the end of the conflict it was Britain which was invading Germany, and this film was not actually very well received by the establishment who felt it was far too hate-filled and violent - precisely the qualities which endeared it to the common moviegoer and made it a hit.

It may have had a message to convey, but a lot of people took it as a wartime adventure, and certainly over the years since the war ended, the film has accrued quite a few fans, including those in the establishment. It seems the main concern from the naysayers was exactly that theme, which stated that everyone in the country, male or female, young or old, owed it to their country to defend it by any means necessary, which involved sweet little old ladies grabbing an axe to hack a German to death, or plucky little boys receiving a gunshot wound in the course of his duty. The violence is not particularly graphic, but anyone familar with straight-talking public information films will know how to the point these scenes can be.

There was freedom at stake, after all, and in Ealing style Went the Day Well? champions the man or woman in the street, the typical British chap or chapess, as opposed to those who were in the higher echelons of society. Not all the upper classes are suspect here of course, but there is Oliver Wilsford (Leslie Banks), apparent leader of the community and local landowner, but actually a fifth columnist who has invited the Nazis to this small, unassuming part of the countryside as the ideal base of operations as they plan to signal the enemy forces. There was a worry at the time that there was a contingent of toffs who would welcome fascist rule, and the Wilsford character appears to back up that fear.

Once Wilsford has welcomed his Nazi major (Basil Sydney), they manage to keep the real reason these troops are here quiet, but the truth will always out and little slips, like using the Continental seven or concealing a bar of chocolate with "Chokolade" written on it arouses suspicion. Wishing to nip any revolt in the bud, the Germans round everyone up in the church, gun down the vicar when he tries to sound the bell for the alarm, and cut off all communications. We can see how ruthless these enemies are portrayed when they start slapping women about and planning to shoot five children when there's an escape attempt, which makes the Brits' need to reclaim their territory by savage means all the more important. There's even a sense of glee when the shooting starts at the finale, but the notion that even this idyllic hamlet will be under threat would have been the real point, even if audiences were watching mainly for the thrills. Music by William Walton.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3976 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
Andrew Pragasam
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: