HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
Diana's Wedding
Deerskin
Toll, The
Two of Us
Nowhere Special
Rainbow Jacket, The
Crazy Samurai: 400 vs 1
First Cow
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  Wild Angels, The Hit The Road
Year: 1966
Director: Roger Corman
Stars: Peter Fonda, Nancy Sinatra, Bruce Dern, Diane Ladd, Buck Taylor, Michael J. Pollard, Marc Cavell, Gayle Hunnicutt, Joan Shawlee, Dick Miller
Genre: Drama, TrashBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Blues (Peter Fonda) is the leader of a chapter of Californian Hell's Angels. He turns up at the workplace of his friend Loser (Bruce Dern) to tell him that his missing motorcycle has been found, but the encounter ends up costing Loser his job. Regardless, the Angels set off for a Mexican garage where they suspect the bike has ended up, but they're headed for trouble with the police...

This exploitation expose, scripted by Charles B. Griffith, was very controversial in its day for its violence and nihilistic attitude. It also started a whole cycle (pardon the pun) of Hell's Angels movies, and can also be seen as the precursor to Easy Rider, although it's brutal characters and lack of plot have a style all their own. These men and women only care about speed, dope, sex and alcohol - nothing matters except having a good time all the time, especially if it's at society's expense.

There are some great lines that sum up the approach: when a Highway Patrolman pulls up alongside the Angels and asks them where they're going, one replies, "Anywhere but here, man!" The Man is the main obstacle in the path to a true good time, as is made plain when Loser is shot in the back after stealing a police motorbike. The Angels want to be free to do what they want to do, but their freedom includes the right to kick other people's heads in and rape women as they see fit. Of course if they'd trusted society a little more, then Loser wouldn't have died when they "liberated" him from the hospital.

The cinematography ensures the film looks very fine in its outdoor scenes, with the vast, sunbaked, desert plains making the film look like a Sergio Leone western with motorbikes. Hand held cameras lend a gritty look to proceedings, too. As for the two leads, Fonda and Nancy Sinatra (playing his girlfriend) prove that coolness does not necessarily guarantee scintillating thespian talent, but their limited acting suits the tone. The rest of the gang (which includes some authentic Angels) are appropriately rowdy, with brawling men and available women - one party scene resembles a medieval shindig.

The sequence that provokes the most controversy is the funeral (the undertaker wonders if a vet signed the death certificate!), where the bikers take over a church, with Loser's coffin draped in a swastika flag. They get a reluctant preacher to take the service, but his talk of God angers Blues, and he delivers his famous "And we want to get loaded!" speech, made famous by being sampled by Scottish indie band Primal Scream in the early nineties. before the assembled throng wreck the church, beat up the preacher, gang rape Loser's girlfriend (Diane Ladd), fight, drink and smoke dope. After all that mayhem, Blues reasons there's nowhere left to go, and he's probably right, the Wild Angels have done it all - and then some - in the name of self expression.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 8669 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Roger Corman  (1926 - )

Legendary American B-Movie producer and director who, from the fifties onwards, offered low budget thrills with economy and flair. Early films include It Conquered the World, Not of This Earth, Attack of the Crab Monsters, A Bucket of Blood, The Little Shop of Horrors and X. The Intruder was a rare attempt at straightforward social comment.

Come the sixties, Corman found unexpected respectability when he adapted Edgar Allan Poe stories for the screen: House of Usher, Pit and The Pendulum, The Masque of the Red Death and The Tomb of Ligeia among them, usually starring Vincent Price. He even tried his hand at counterculture films such as The Wild Angels, The Trip and Gas!, before turning to producing full time in the seventies.

Many notable talents have been given their break by Corman, such as Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorcese, Monte Hellman, Jonathan Demme, Joe Dante, James Cameron and Peter Bogdanovich. Corman returned to directing in 1990 with the disappointing Frankenstein Unbound.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: