HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Dementer
Beyond Clueless
Stylist, The
Sky is On Fire, The
Wrong Turn
In a Year with 13 Moons
Blush
Strange Affair of Uncle Harry, The
Sinners, The
Tammy and the T-Rex
Archenemy
Zappa
Mindwarp
State Secret
Mogul Mowgli
Owners, The
Twentieth Century, The
Story of Gilbert and Sullivan, The
What Lies Below
Greenland
Broil
Dead Pigs
Willy's Wonderland
It's in the Air
School's Out Forever
Breeder
Stump the Guesser
Sator
Last Warning, The
PVT CHAT
Ascent, The
Clementine
Hurt by Paradise
Saint Maud
Johnny Frenchman
Glitch in the Matrix, A
Beginning
Meeting the Man: James Baldwin in Paris
Funeral Home, The
Sailors Three
   
 
Newest Articles
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
Newley Minted: The Strange World of Gurney Slade on Blu-ray
Bad Love: The Night Porter on Blu-ray
Brevity is the Soul of Weird: Short Sharp Shocks on Blu-ray
Get Your Ass to Mars: Total Recall on Blu-ray
Call the Professionals: Le Cercle Rouge on Blu-ray
When There's No More Room in Hell: Dawn of the Dead on Blu-ray
The Butterfly Effect: Mothra on Blu-ray
Living Room Theatre: Play for Today Volume 1 on Blu-ray
Didn't He Do Well: The Bruce Forsyth Show on DVD
   
 
  Mad Dog and Glory Take A Picture, It'll Last Longer
Year: 1993
Director: John McNaughton
Stars: Robert De Niro, Uma Thurman, Bill Murray, David Caruso, Mike Starr, Tom Towles, Kathy Baker, Derek Annunciation, Doug Hara, Evan Lionel, Anthony Cannata, J.J. Johnston, Guy Van Swearingen, Jack Wallace, Richard Belzer
Genre: DramaBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 3 votes)
Review: A drugs dealer climbs into a car and asks the two men inside if they are looking for anything, but things quickly turn nasty when the passenger pulls a gun on him and fills him with lead. To top that, he then murders the driver so he can have all the drugs to himself, then dumps his body in the back; soon the police are on the scene, including their resident photographer Wayne (Robert De Niro) who they ironically call Mad Dog on account of his reserved nature. After he has taken the pictures, he heads off to the nearby convenience store, where he has a life-changing surprise waiting for him...

That surprise is none other than Bill Murray, and the point here was that the two stars were playing against type. So when Wayne realises that there's something up in the store when he notices Murray's Frank Milo lying on the floor behind the counter, he does not turn to De Niro-style violence on the thug who is posing as the shopkeeper, but talks him down and allows him to escape. Frank is disgusted at this and for his trouble gets hit on the head by the escaping felon, the same one who killed in the opening scene, but this will spark a curious relationship.

Originally the filmmakers wanted De Niro to play Frank, and that is because he would have been the latest in the run of gangster roles for the star, but he insisted on being the mousy Wayne instead, and his instincts proved correct, for he's not bad at all as the shy photographer who is something of a loser: unmarried despite being in middle age, his youthful dreams of being an artist long behind him, and unable to say boo to a goose. Murray's Mafia boss is no less intriguing for going against his typical style, a would-be stand up comedian who brings out the crueller side to Murray's wisecracking persona - Frank really isn't a very funny guy, in spite of the way his underlings laugh sycophantically at his jokes.

Not that you could say this to his face: not until Wayne, after being invited to Frank's club to see his act, voices the opinion that his routine seems too hostile to be all that amusing. Frank simply wanted to thank him for saving his life, as ordered to by his therapist, but now he feels there's a connection and spends the evening with him. Wayne is pleased with the attention, though doesn't think it will go any further seeing as how they're on opposite sides of the law, but then Frank gives him a gift which topples the film into uncomfortable male wish fulfilment fantasy. The gift is a woman, Glory (Uma Thurman), who will stay with him for a week.

Wayne is lonely, no doubt about it, and Richard Price's script has him try to persuade Glory to leave him alone, but you won't be convinced and after a while he has fallen in love with her, although we're never sure whether she wholly feels the same way about him or is simply saying what she thinks Frank wants her to say. Really it's all about Wayne reclaiming his masculinity, finding his feet in a world where all the other men have no compunctions about using force to get what they want, a world where Wayne doesn't fit too well. Yet Price presents him as being liberated by the macho bullshit, and the reshoots that were imposed on the originally less heroic film mean that director John McNaughton's work seems to be endorsing what is pretty much a form of prostitution as being good for the (male) soul. It's a film that never finds its groove, but De Niro and Murray are worth seeing for their idiosyncratic - for the time - performances. Music by Elmer Bernstein.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2833 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Stately Wayne Manor
Enoch Sneed
  Geraint Morgan
   

 

Last Updated: