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  Perfect Friday Ursula 'Undress' Ha ha! Get it?
Year: 1970
Director: Peter Hall
Stars: Stanley Baker, Ursula Andress, David Warner, Patience Collier, T.P. McKenna, David Waller, Joan Benham, Julian Orchard, Trisha Mortimer, Anne Tirard, Johnny Briggs, Fred Griffiths
Genre: Comedy, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 2 votes)
Review: Mr Graham (Stanley Baker) is a lonely, lower manager in a large London bank with an otherwise unremarkable life until he meets Lady Britt Dorset (Ursula Andress). She and her husband Lord Nick Dorset (David Warner) have financial problems. Nick wants to live a high standard of life with no intention of finding a way to pay for it. Britt similarly, is unable to care about anything other than herself. Graham agrees to give a loan to Britt which she duly spends on a sports car and clothes. She meets him outside the bank in it and seduces him to spend lunch at a local beauty spot (a gravel pit in outer London). Graham seizes on their difficulties and suggests a bank robbery.

None of the three are to be trusted and a love triangle develops. A sum of £300,000 (it's 1970) is to be stolen from the vault under the bank's nose. The plan is clever and intricate, requiring Nick to impersonate a bank inspector on just the right day - the perfect Friday and exchange a box. All three have their own ideas and both men think they're going away with Britt at the end. A flat is rented and costumes purchased. The robbery eventually goes ahead without incident, but who goes away with Britt at Heathrow?

This is a fun heist caper which seems to be one of many that came out in the 60's and 70's. The cast is slightly odd but works. There is some good comedy, which diverts from the fact that there is never any real suspense. Graham is stuffy. Britt is foreign and easy (plenty of nudey scenes). Nick is effete and snotty. All three leads carry their parts very well and there is convincing chemistry between them. The actual theft is carefully thought out, but without excitement. I liked the intelligent dialogue. Plus the camera work and sharp editing retain interest. It never drags but the middle sags and will bore many. Like a modest white wine, it's easy to enjoy on an afternoon. The film feels British right from the start thanks to John Dankworth's score.
Reviewer: Simon Aronsson

 

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