HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Elvis: That's the Way It Is
Man Who Laughs, The
Watch List
Giraffe
Kat and the Band
Echo
Perfect 10
Octaman
Red Penguins
China Syndrome, The
Babyteeth
Round-Up, The
Around the Sun
Once There Was Brasilia
Peripheral
Dead Pigeon on Beethoven Street
Ice
She Demons
Good Girls, The
Hail, Hero!
Faces in the Crowd
Tamango
Traitor, The
Tomorrow
Third Generation, The
Saxon Charm, The
Spy Intervention
Moonrise
Mulan
Killer with a Thousand Eyes, The
Vigil, The
Liberation of L.B. Jones, The
Wizard of Baghdad, The
Ride
Good Manners
Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo
Sweet Home
Big Score, The
Siddhartha
Three Outlaw Samurai
   
 
Newest Articles
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights in with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
Country Matters: Further Out of Town on Blu-ray
Bat-Damn: Was Joel Schumacher's Batman Really That Bad?
The Beat Goes On: Takeshi Kitano Collection on Blu-ray
Dream Treats: Scorsese Shorts on Blu-ray
It's Only Money: Laughter in Paradise on Blu-ray
A Regular Terpsichore: Dance, Girl, Dance on Blu-ray
Teenage Trauma: Baby Love on Blu-ray
The Happening: Pet Shop Boys It Couldn't Happen Here on Blu-ray
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
   
 
  All This and World War II Give Peace A Chance
Year: 1976
Director: Susan Winslow
Stars: Various
Genre: Musical, War, DocumentaryBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: To the strains of the Beatles song "Magical Mystery Tour" but not performed by them as Ambrosia are doing it instead, the footage begins, scenes of the nineteen-thirties in Nazi Germany where Adolf Hitler is amassing his forces. World War II is brewing, and before you know what's happening, the Nazis are advancing across Europe and the battles have begun... and set to the music of the most famous band ever to emerge from Britain. But only in cover version form.

If that sounds like a stupid idea, I don't know if setting the war footage to the originals would have been any better. As a way to sell a compilation album, there have been more inspired notions, but few as strange and likely to prompt the pressing question, "What were they thinking?" Sticking with newsreels sprinkled with the odd bit of contemporary film, as well as movie clips made after when there's a frustrating lack of newsreel to go around, All This and World War II is one long montage, and needless to say the songs are not really performed more satisfyingly than the Fab Four did originally.

At times the connections between the tunes and what they're paired with are crushingly obvious, to say the least. Hitler is "The Fool on the Hill", as Helen Reddy tells us, and Benito Mussolini, later on when things aren't going his way, is the "Nowhere Man" according to Jeff Lynne. Is Leo Sayer's rendering of "The Long and Winding Road" improved any by the booms of shells exploding and bombs falling? Is "Sun King" trilled by the Bee Gees as the Japanese aeroplanes fly to Pearl Harbor in poor taste? Come to think of it, how does any of this ennoble the fighting of those six years?

Well, it doesn't really, and the producers apparently believed that the Beatles' sounds would be more fittingly presented with plaintive strings and self-important brass at every turn. Elton John's "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" is probably the most recognisable cover here, but even that is somewhat lacklustre, despite having John Lennon on guitar. Mainly you cringe at the choices of artists, whether it's Frankie Valli giving us his "A Day in the Life" or an act that must have been pretty obscure even then belting out yet another number.

If you didn't know much about World War II, then I'm not sure how helpful this film would be, as events fly by as if to pack in as much of the history as possible. However, the most glaring omission has to be the utter lack of mention of the Holocaust: perhaps even this project thought it too much of a stretch to enhance concentration camp images with Lennon and Paul McCartney songs? But why Lennon and McCartney at all? They didn't have any obvious connection to the tragedies, but maybe as the Beatles were meaningful to the younger generation of the day, it was hoped that their music would attract them to the significance of the Second World War. In effect, it's misguided at best, yet strangely compelling.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4729 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: