HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Dear Future Children Their World Now
Year: 2021
Director: Franz Bohm
Stars: Various
Genre: DocumentaryBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: These are the stories of three young women who have sacrificed some of their lives to give over to protest. There is Rayen, who lives in Chile and joined the uprising there among the poor, who were victimised by the wealthy government and elites to put them even further into poverty, there is Hilda from Uganda who saw her family's farming livelihood destroyed by climate change and has started her own activist's movement, and there is "Pepper", a Hong Kong resident who was, like her fellow citizens, horrified when China eroded the democracy in the territory and cracked down on any form of complaint...

Now, these three women, despite what you may think in the way they are presented here, are not equivalents from three different continents. They go about their protests in different styles, and while Rayen has no problem with fighting back against the police who make it seem the bad old days of the Pinochet regime are not so far away after all, Hilda takes a more peaceful tack and spends her time clearing waterways of plastic waste when she is not trying to place pressure on the authorities to do something about an issue that is increasingly being felt in the poorer states of the planet. And Pepper, poor Pepper.

She tries her best, as do the other protestors who took to the Hong Kong streets, but if you had been following the news in the years since her activism was filmed, you would be well aware that they failed, the brutality of the Chinese authorities was too strong and many of the activists were forced to flee across the globe as refugees, the ones who were not arrested and imprisoned, that was. Or even killed - Pepper's friend, we hear, was so filled with despair that she took her own life, though how prevalent that is, is unclear, we do know China has a suicide problem, not that they admit as much, and you imagine their repression has led to those troubles in Hong Kong too.

Chile, meanwhile, is supposed to be a democracy, but the way Rayen tells it, anyone in any country in the world would just have to start pushing back against injustice to find their existence suddenly made very difficult indeed. While the working class Chileans took to the streets, they found that decades of dictatorship had trained the police to use some very unpleasant tactics, and their latest trick is to fire rubber bullets into the eyes of the protestors, or even someone who looks like they might be thinking of protesting, leaving hundreds of citizens losing their sight in one or both eyes. It's a horribly barbaric course of action, and there does not appear to be any recourse to justice on behalf of those who have been shot.

Hilda, however, is made to look as if her protest is doing good in real terms, which after a COP26 conference in 2021 that gave a "Hmm... maybe" to the question of whether the most powerful could do anything concrete to stop the climate change crisis, rings a little hollow. On the other hand, Hilda is the only one of these three women you can look up on the internet, since the other two have to preserve their anonymity: Rayen we can view, mind you, but Pepper (not her real name) is concealed under her anti-pollution mask throughout, so justifiably paranoid is she that she could be seriously injured or murdered for speaking out about her oppression. Hilda is the positive face of pressure groups, someone who has found people listening to her because she is a charismatic frontwoman and the matters she champions sound like something that could be solved if we listen to those like her. But Rayen and Pepper? Their stories make the ordinary folks feel pretty helpless, and it would be nice if this film acknowledged that, it might be the first step to improvement.

[Dear Future Children is now in UK cinemas from & 80 Odeon Cinemas 23 November 2021 for One Night Only! Click here to buy tickets.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1053 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
  Louise Hackett
Darren Jones
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: