HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Aquaman Trident Tested
Year: 2018
Director: James Wan
Stars: Jason Momoa, Amber Heard, Willem Dafoe, Patrick Wilson, Nicole Kidman, Dolph Lundgren, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Temuera Morrison, Ludi Lin, Michael Beach, Randall Park, Graham McTavish, Leigh Whannell, Julie Andrews, John Rhys-Davies, Djimon Hounsou
Genre: Action, Fantasy, AdventureBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Aquaman (Jason Momoa), real name Arthur Curry, has a tale to tell about how his parents met. It was a dark and stormy night, and his father Tom (Temuera Morrison) was a lighthouse keeper who noticed a figure lying on the rocks - it was a woman (Nicole Kidman) and he brought her inside, only for her to act with some hostility towards him. She was suspicious of his motives, having struggled in her undersea home of Atlantis, of which she was Queen Atlanna, but she realised with this kind man she could enjoy a new life away from the ocean, and by and by settled down with him, giving birth to his child, who would grow into Aquaman, half-human denizen of the waters...

It's safe to say few had any great expectations for this, another entry in DC's try at creating a universe in a manner that had seen their chief rival Marvel win hit after hit at the international box office. Yet the surprise was that Aquaman was an enormous success, equalling the only other real DC effort of this cycle that had been ardently appreciated, Wonder Woman; part of that was thanks to the East Asian market, as it went down like free ice cream there in a culture that was less allied to realism in its fantasy movies. It may sound like a strange thing to say, but in the West the idea that a fantastical premise or styling wasn't believable was a genuine sticking point there, not so Eastwards.

Thus Aquaman's stirring series of candy-coloured seascapes and costumes that paraded across the screen as if saying, "Yeah, I'm riding a giant seahorse, you got a problem with that?" were actually quite captivating to the eyes, a confection that may have been bizarre, even goofy, yet was presented with such lack of embarrassment that it made you wonder what your misgivings about it were worth. There were those who refused to go along with director James Wan's purposefully weird and wacky approach, but it appeared the majority of those who caught this were appropriately appreciative of his efforts, and "got" his unapologetically nutty techniques.

This was, after all, a story about a musclebound bloke who can not only breathe underwater, but hold regular conversations and swim like a torpedo around the deep too, so what was Wan going to do, go for gritty realism? Of course not, he looked back to the excesses of the Silver Age and decided to take them seriously, so while there were wisecracks from Momoa to help you settle in, the stakes were high when it introduced the pollution angle for the younger viewers to engage with, that being a hot button topic at the time this was released. Though the ecology angle was not its main concern, the idea that all our waste products could be returned to clog up the land was a reminder of how much garbage winds up in the ocean - an Aquaman bugbear here providing the impetus for his half-brother Orm (Patrick Wilson) to move towards war with us landlubbers.

Meanwhile, a mermaid princess (after a fashion) named Mera (Amber Heard with My Little Pony hair) was on hand to assist Aquaman in countering Orm and whatever other bad guys might be around, including Manta (Yahya Abdul-Mateen II) who bears a grudge against him after Arthur failed to rescue Manta's father (arrogantly, since they were trying to commandeer a submarine illegally at the time, causing death among the crew, so you can see the hero's point). Yes, there were the over the top punch-ups, but something about Wan's vision for this movie compared favourably with the Italian peplum series of the fifties and sixties where body builders played Hercules, Atlas or Maciste in oft-eccentric takes of Roman mythology. It was not the sole influence, but it had the same appeal, not merely in Aquaman but in many a superhero piece, it was just that this was more blatant about it. With one of the most varied casts in a genre movie, Dolph Lundgren rubbing shoulders with Willem Dafoe, you may have pondered what else they could do with the character, but as it stood, this was daft and enjoyable, with an awareness of history and your place in it too. Music by Rupert Gregson-Williams.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5352 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
  Louise Hackett
Darren Jones
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: