HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Halloween Kills
Cicada
Sun Shines Bright, The
Last Thing Mary Saw, The
Comets
Herself
Mon Oncle d'Amerique
Wild Strawberries
Runner, The
Don't Look Up
Ghostbusters: Afterlife
Eternals
Forever Purge, The
Memoria
Venom: Let There Be Carnage
Legend of La Llorona, The
Japon
Glasshouse
Perdita Durango
Commando, The
Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A History of Folk Horror
Boiling Point
Malignant
Deadly Games
Ailey
Voyeurs, The
Beyond the Infinite Two Minutes
In the Earth
Hiroshima Mon Amour
Hotel Poseidon
Zola
No Time to Die
Klaus
Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey
Candyman
Power of the Dog, The
StageFright
Voyage of Time: An IMAX Documentary
Suicide Squad, The
One Night in Miami...
   
 
Newest Articles
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
Vestron Double Bill: Dementia 13 and The Wraith
Farewell Dean Stockwell: His Years of Weirdness
Kung Fu Craft: Cinematic Vengeance! on Blu-ray
999 Letsbe Avenue: Gideon's Way on Blu-ray
Hungary for Cartoons: Hungarian Animations on MUBI
You Have No Choice: Invasion of the Body Snatchers on Blu-ray
You Can't Tame What's Meant to Be Wild: The Howling on Blu-ray
Commendably Brief: Short Sharp Shocks Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Super Silents: Early Universal Vol. 2 on Blu-ray
Fable Fear: The Singing Ringing Tree on Blu-ray
Gunsight Eyes: The Sabata Trilogy on Blu-ray
Bloody Bastard Baby: The Monster/I Don't Want to Be Born on Blu-ray
Night of the Animated Dead: Director Jason Axinn Interview
The ParaPod: A Very British Ghost Hunt - Interview with Director/Star Ian Boldsworth
On the Right Track: Best of British Transport Films Vol. 2
The Guns of Nutty Joan: Johnny Guitar on Blu-ray
Intercourse Between Two Worlds: Twin Peaks Fire Walk with Me/The Missing Pieces on Blu-ray
Enjoy the Silents: Early Universal Vol. 1 on Blu-ray
Masterful: The Servant on Blu-ray
   
 
  Mothman Prophecies, The Don't Get Into A Flap
Year: 2002
Director: Mark Pellington
Stars: Richard Gere, Laura Linney, Will Patton, Alan Bates, Debra Messing, Lucinda Jenney, David Eigenberg, Rohn Thomas
Genre: Drama, Science Fiction, WeirdoBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: John Klein (Richard Gere) was a top reporter for the Washington Post, happily married to wife Mary (Debra Messing) and just buying a new house which he was very pleased they could afford. Things could not have been going better, which with cruel fate was the point they got considerably worse as when he was a passenger in the car his wife was driving home one night in December, suddenly she was distracted by something - he was never sure what - and crashed the vehicle, suffering head injuries she never recovered from...

This small town chiller was adapted by Richard Hatem from John Keel's celebrated account of the supposedly true "high strangeness" case of the nineteen-sixties in the West Virginia region of Point Pleasant. Klein and the townsfolk are faced with lights in the sky, ghosts and odd electrical phenomema, as well as visions of an otherworldy figure they call the Mothman, all of which were loosely drawn from the book, though if anything Keel's telling was even weirder and more specific about the oddities, while retaining the essential mystery of a universe overseen by some cosmic prankster.

Despite it's conventional mystery structure, it's more of an exercise in sustained mood and atmosphere than a typical sci fi/horror movie where Gere didn't get a chance to do anything much except look stressed. There is plenty of nervy camerawork, funny noises, flashes of barely glimpsed visuals of obscure significance, spooky music courtesy of Tomandandy and a generally enigmatic air. Many people's main problem with The Mothman Prophecies is its insistence that you take it's "true-life" mysteries very seriously, though compared to the book, it's quite restrained. The Mothman is represented by abstract images, and the bizarre "Men in Black" of the book are reduced to a sinister voice in the telephone.

One issue which may be more valid with all this is that two hours is a long time to sit through a film that refuses to explain itself. Alan Bates turns up as a paranormal investigator with vague ideas of higher beings and an unhelpful "there are some things man was not meant to know" attitude which the film finally adopts for itself. The Bates character is named Leek, alluding to a more faithful representation of the actual Keel, who as this plays is a hybrid of the two journalists, as if the script got cold feet about dedicating itself to endorsing the source, which had a bit of a cheek considering how it was relying on its conundrums to bring in the punters. However, the finale is spectacular enough to justify your interest as the cop Connie (Laura Linney) and her wise words about there being some events you simply cannot do anything about come back to haunt them.

As this works out its themes, it's more about Klein's guilt at being unable to save his beloved wife manifested as the mystery than it is getting to the bottom of whatever uncanny entities may be working behind the scenes of the known universe. Still, there's plenty of that as well, with at least one semi-classic scene of spookiness where Klein receives a telephone call from the film's substitute Man in Black character while in his motel room and becomes convinced by the unseen, distorted voice on the line that the person (?) can actually see what he's doing in spite of being at the home of one of the paranoid victims of the curious machinations - use of the phone is underrated as a method of raising the hairs on the back of the audience's necks. Also with: lots of close-ups of ears, and director Mark Pellington as a bartender; as an exercise in creepy atmosphere, its shortcomings are almost overlooked. So there you go, a review of The Mothman Prophecies that doesn't mention The X Files. Oh, wait a minute...
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 5609 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Jason Cook
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
   

 

Last Updated: