HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
American Fiction
Poor Things
Thunderclap
Zeiram
Legend of the Bat
Party Line
Night Fright
Pacha, Le
Kimi
Assemble Insert
Venus Tear Diamond, The
Promare
Beauty's Evil Roses, The
Free Guy
Huck and Tom's Mississippi Adventure
Rejuvenator, The
Who Fears the Devil?
Guignolo, Le
Batman, The
Land of Many Perfumes
Cat vs. Rat
Tom & Jerry: The Movie
Naked Violence
Joyeuses Pacques
Strangeness, The
How I Became a Superhero
Golden Nun
Incident at Phantom Hill
Winterhawk
Resident Evil: Welcome to Raccoon City
Maigret Sets a Trap
B.N.A.
Hell's Wind Staff, The
Topo Gigio and the Missile War
Battant, Le
Penguin Highway
Cazadore de Demonios
Snatchers
Imperial Swordsman
Foxtrap
   
 
Newest Articles
3 From Arrow Player: Sweet Sugar, Girls Nite Out and Manhattan Baby
Little Cat Feat: Stephen King's Cat's Eye on 4K UHD
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
   
 
  Detroit There's A Riot Goin' On
Year: 2017
Director: Kathryn Bigelow
Stars: John Boyega, Will Poulter, Algee Smith, Ben O'Toole, Jack Reynor, Jacob Latimore, Hannah Murray, Kaitlyn Dever, Nathan Davis Jr, Anthony Mackie, John Krasinski, Gbenga Akinnagbe, Chris Chalk, Joseph David-Jones, Leon Thomas III, Ephraim Sykes
Genre: HistoricalBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Detroit in 1967 became a national talking point in the United States when the simmering tensions among the black community there, packed into what was effectively a ghetto in the city as the whites had moved to the suburbs, erupted into violence on a massive scale as disenfranchised locals took the streets and began to take out their anger on both their environment and the emergency services and cops who were trying to contain the situation. As public leaders tried to talk them down, the denizens refused to be cowed and finally they felt as if they were grabbing the attention of the wider world, and just as happened in other America cities, the riots continued, setting the races against one another...

That theme of racial violence born of prejudice and ignorance was an important one in director Kathryn Bigelow's factually-based drama, especially since she and her screenwriter Mark Boal, marking their third collaboration, were inspired by the tensions between the police and the African American community in more modern times, warning us this had occurred before and was not going away any time soon. Some would point out that the black members of society were more likely to murder each other than the police were to shoot them, but that failed to take into account the fact that cops were not employed to gun citizens down, they were supposed to be keeping the peace.

Certainly there were cases where dangerous criminals were met with force from the authorities, but there had also been high profile stories of innocent black men, and even teenage boys, being killed or injured by apparently trigger happy policemen, so it was little wonder this fed into the resentment many were feeling for those who were intended to protect and serve. However, what were we to make of what Bigelow and Boal adopted as the subject for what was, after all, an event that took in thousands of people in one city? They chose the once-notorious Hotel Algiers incident, a cause celebre for those who felt the police had gotten out of control in their endeavours to keep the peace.

Although now that crime scene was known largely by those who studied the '67 riots if not anyone else, this was a try at bringing it back into the consciousness of those who saw the movie, yet the problem with that was the specific course of events that led to three dead men there had never been entirely ascertained, so there was a sense of filling in the gaps with conjecture here. It was clear there had been a miscarriage of justice on that fateful night, some time into the frame of the disturbances, as no one was ever found guilty of the victims' deaths, despite what we were told here was a blatant act of murder by cops carried away with the atmosphere of terror the riots engendered. It went further than that: the white policemen were fuelling their aggressive racism with the acts of the rioters, justifying their brutality in a get them before they get you manner.

What this did was to take the bigger picture of the region, and gradually focus in towards the hotel, with a scene were the unlicensed Blind Pig bar was cracked down on triggering the mayhem, alighting on to various incidents before drawing together the characters, based in fact, who would be the major players. So precise was that focus that much of the middle section was concentrated on the faces of the actors in one single hallway, as the cops, erroneously believing they had been shot at by a sniper from the establishment, lined up their suspects, including two young, white women, and subjected them to a haranguing series of abuses. Bigelow achieved an intense degree of outrage here, as while there were misbehaviours on all sides, none of the victims, living or dead, at the Algiers deserved what they were inflicted with, and the fear that if the authorities are out of control then nobody can hold them to account was palpable. Very well acted by an excellent ensemble, Detroit really rose or fell depending on whether you thought it was fair or not; it did manage a certain balance, it had to be said. Music by James Newton Howard.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2420 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Kathryn Bigelow  (1951 - )

After a starting her career as an artist, this American director and writer moved into the world of film, making her first feature The Loveless in 1982. Five years later came the film which made her name, the modern vampire tale Near Dark, and she followed it up with equally cult-ish thrillers Blue Steel, Point Break and Strange Days. However, The Weight of Water and K-19: The Widowmaker were critical and financial failures, and she fell quiet until Iraq war drama The Hurt Locker over five years later, for which she became the first woman to win the Best Director Oscar. She then dramatised the hunt for Osama bin Laden in the controversial Zero Dark Thirty, and tackled the 1967 riots of Detroit. She was once married to fellow director James Cameron, and directed episodes of Wild Palms and Homicide: Life on the Street.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
  Louise Hackett
Mark Le Surf-hall
Andrew Pragasam
Mary Sibley
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: