HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Beast and the Magic Sword, The
Last Hard Men, The
Found Footage Phenomenon, The
Night Trap
Skinny Tiger, Fatty Dragon
Benediction
Nezha Reborn
Evil Toons
Worst Person in the World, The
Whirlpool
Hunter Will Get You
Superman/Batman: Apocalypse
Revolver
Men, The
Parallel Mothers
Sadness, The
Bloody New Year
Faye
Body Count
Spider-Man: No Way Home
'Round Midnight
Wild Men
Barry & Joan
Wake Up Punk
Twin, The
Wheel of Fortune and Fantasy
One of These Days
Lift to the Scaffold
Savage Dawn
Rest in Pieces
Innocents in Paris
We're All Going to the World's Fair
Beyond the Door 3
Jules et Jim
Love Jones
Saint-Narcisse
Souvenir Part II, The
Knockabout
400 Blows, The
Virus: 32
   
 
Newest Articles
La Violence: Dobermann at 25
Serious Comedy: The Wrong Arm of the Law on Blu-ray
DC Showcase: Constantine - The House of Mystery and More on Blu-ray
Monster Fun: Three Monster Tales of Sci-Fi Terror on Blu-ray
State of the 70s: Play for Today Volume 3 on Blu-ray
The Movie Damned: Cursed Films II on Shudder
The Dead of Night: In Cold Blood on Blu-ray
Suave and Sophisticated: The Persuaders! Take 50 on Blu-ray
Your Rules are Really Beginning to Annoy Me: Escape from L.A. on 4K UHD
A Woman's Viewfinder: The Camera is Ours on DVD
Chaplin's Silent Pursuit: Modern Times on Blu-ray
The Ecstasy of Cosmic Boredom: Dark Star on Arrow
A Frosty Reception: South and The Great White Silence on Blu-ray
You'll Never Guess Which is Sammo: Skinny Tiger and Fatty Dragon on Blu-ray
Two Christopher Miles Shorts: The Six-Sided Triangle/Rhythm 'n' Greens on Blu-ray
Not So Permissive: The Lovers! on Blu-ray
Uncomfortable Truths: Three Shorts by Andrea Arnold on MUBI
The Call of Nostalgia: Ghostbusters Afterlife on Blu-ray
Moon Night - Space 1999: Super Space Theater on Blu-ray
Super Sammo: Warriors Two and The Prodigal Son on Blu-ray
Sex vs Violence: In the Realm of the Senses on Blu-ray
What's So Funny About Brit Horror? Vampira and Bloodbath at the House of Death on Arrow
Keeping the Beatles Alive: Get Back
The Punk Rock Movie: Out of the Blue on Blu-ray
Yeah, Too Quiet: The Great Silence on Blu-ray
   
 
  One-Eyed Jacks Brando The Kid
Year: 1961
Director: Marlon Brando
Stars: Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Pina Pellicer, Katy Jurado, Ben Johnson, Slim Pickens, Larry Duran, Sam Gilman, Timothy Carey, Miriam Colon, Elisha Cook Jr, Rodolfo Acosta, Tom Webb, Ray Teal, John Dierkes, Philip Ahn, Hank Worden
Genre: WesternBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Rio (Marlon Brando) is an outlaw in Mexico, part of a gang with Doc (Hank Worden) and the man who is effectively his father figure, Dad Longworth (Karl Malden), but the time may have come for the law to catch up with them after an apparently successful bank robbery where Rio sat on the counter without a care in the world as his cohorts relieved the safe of its contents. He even went as far as liberating a jewelled ring from a woman who was trying and failing to conceal it from him, thinking it would come in handy later, for he is quite the womaniser. But later, the police catch up with them, and it seems all three will meet a sticky end: Doc dies, Rio is imprisoned, but Dad... well, Dad sells them out.

According to the cultists of One-Eyed Jacks, it was a misunderstood masterpiece that never found its correct audience at the time, and has only gone on in the decades after to be appreciated since after all, how could a star of Brando's genius get it wrong? What they fail to perceive was that as an actor, he was no director, and after securing the means to helm the project himself after Stanley Kubrick proved reluctant to continue their association (he was about to suffer his own debacles on Spartacus) he proceeded to piss millions of dollars up the wall with his shoot, extending it by months supposedly so he could capture the right conditions for his filming, and encouraging long improvisation sessions with his cast, all of which were filmed.

As legend has it, an insane amount of footage was amassed and Brando had it cut into a five-and-a-half hour edit he was happy with, which naturally the studio Paramount were not, as no matter how big a celebrity he was, they knew nobody was going to sit still for that length of time. So it was recut into a still-substantial two hours twenty minutes, and a new, kind of happy ending was added where the original tragic outcome was considerably softened: movie buffs who rage against studio interference had yet another bastardised effort to complain about. Nevertheless, even among those who were aware about the interference (or desperate salvage job), they felt enough of the director's intentions survived in the version we were offered back in 1961.

The less kind might have observed Brando would have been better suited to the miniseries format as we know it today, and he lost interest after his first flush of enthusiasm, as he became increasingly wont to do as the years rolled by; you could pinpoint when Brando, The Greatest Actor in the World became Brando, The Movie Star Who Didn't Give a Shit Anymore, around the time of this movie as his fifties blockbusters gave way to a series of films he didn't particularly care about other than the profits they made him, and his box office draw faltered, aside from brief bursts of success in blockbusters where he was not necessarily the lead character. But going back to One-Eyed Jacks, which he genuinely did care about, at least for a while, was there anything here to justify his indulgence - could you tell the potential he saw in it?

Originally it was a Billy the Kid yarn guided by Sam Peckinpah, who was about to make waves in Westerns and would make his own variant on this tale in the seventies, but Brando wanted something more romantic, more appealing to an audience expecting a matinee idol perhaps, and so the relationship with Dad's adopted daughter Louisa (Pina Pellicer, the tragic Mexican star) was made the focus to complement the laboured Oedipal business with the obviously-named Dad. He has become a respectable Sheriff in the five years Rio has been in jail, leaving vengeful Rio no option but to upset his apple cart and, in that way when actors try to prove themselves, the plot turns masochistic as the young man is punished by society, all so he can survive the ordeal. It was all very overwrought, and the improv resulted in a lot of meaningful scenes that failed to advance the proceedings, but it did look very crisp, and the coastal setting was an original one for a Western. Alas, it did herald one thing: general audiences becoming alienated from the genre when the psychological and the violent dominated. But it does hold a curiosity factor. Music by Hugo Friedhofer.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2360 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Andrew Pragasam
Graeme Clark
Mary Sibley
  Desbris M
  Sheila Reeves
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Enoch Sneed
   

 

Last Updated: