HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Perfectly Normal Family, A
Ravage
Honeymoon Phase, The
One Summer
Bird Island
Variety
Devil to Pay, The
Gypsy
Lost in London
Divorce Italian Style
Becky
Salon Kitty
Misbehaviour
Charles, Dead or Alive
Gretel and Hansel
Mademoiselle
Tunnel, The
India Song
Last Rhino, The
Made in Hong Kong
Ring of Spies
Rom Boys: 40 Years of Rad
Pocketful of Miracles
The Tomb: Devil's Revenge
Sidecar Racers
Space Dogs
Out/Marriage
Safety Last!
Bride Who Has Returned from Hell, The
Show Boat
Savage
City Called Dragon, A
I Used to Go Here
Six Suspects
Still the Water
Not Now, Comrade
I'm Thinking of Ending Things
Wives of the Skies
Two Heads Creek
Next Stop, Greenwich Village
   
 
Newest Articles
A Knock on the Door at 4 O'clock in the Morning: The Strangers on Blu-ray
Wives of the Skies: Honey Lauren Interview
To Catch a Thief: After the Fox on Blu-ray
Tackling the Football Film: The Arsenal Stadium Mystery on Blu-ray
Film Noir's Golden Couple: This Gun for Hire on Blu-ray
The Doctor Who Connection: Invasion on Blu-ray
Hill's Angles: Benny Hill and Who Done It? on Blu-ray
Big Willie Style: Keep It Up Downstairs on Blu-ray
Walt's Vault: 5 Cult Movies on Disney+
Paradise Lost: Walkabout on Blu-ray
Buster Makes Us Feel Good: Buster Keaton - 3 Films (Volume 3) on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 3 - Don't Go Away - I Could Do with a Bit of Cheer Now!
What Use is Grief to a Horse? Equus on Blu-ray
For God's Sake Strap Yourselves Down: Flash Gordon on 4K UHD Collector's Edition
Party Hard: Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 2 - Your Faces are All Blurred!
Eve Knew Her Apples: The Lady Eve on Blu-ray
Network On Air: Tempo - Gallery One
Network On Air: Nights In with ABC 1 - Welcome Once Again to Manchester!
Transformative Apocalypses: Phase IV and Southland Tales
The Happiest Days of Their Lives: The Guinea Pig on Blu-ray
Faced Poe: Three Edgar Allan Poe Adaptations Starring Bela Lugosi on Blu-ray
Hard Luck, Buster: The Cameraman on Blu-ray
At the Hop: Mr. Vampire on Blu-ray
Divine Madness: Female Trouble on Blu-ray
   
 
  Orloff Against the Invisible Man Now You See Him...
Year: 1970
Director: Pierre Chevalier
Stars: Howard Vernon, Brigitte Carva, Fernando Sancho, Paco Valladares, Isabel del Rio, Evane Hanska, Arlette Balkis, May Chartrette, Christian Forges, Eugène Berthier
Genre: Horror, TrashBuy from Amazon
Rating:  3 (from 1 vote)
Review: Doctor Garondet (Paco Villadares) is startled on evening by a knock on his front door, and goes to ask his housekeeper who was there but she is dismissive and says it was merely some boy asking for help at the Orloff Castle. The villagers do their best to avoid visiting the old building thanks to a superstition about who lives there, but Garodent insists on catching the boy and enquiring what the problem was. He does not get much of an answer before he runs off, so ventures into the tavern to ask if anyone can help him on the journey and after surly reactions one coachman agrees to take him, but on the way there the carriage gets stuck and when the doctor get out to shift it, the coachman rides away, leaving him to his own devices...

You would be tempted to think the filmmakers did not want the doctor to reach the castle, never mind the villagers, judging by the degree of faffing about the audience had to endure before the plot kicked off properly. Par for the course for a Jess Franco movie, he being the man who had made the Orloff series a minor name to conjure with in exploitation circles, itself a rip-off of Georges Franju's unforgettable mad scientist horror Eyes Without a Face, but take a look at the credits and you would see that Franco's name was nowhere to be seen. No, he had not turned invisible like the title villain, he was actually getting ripped off himself, or at least he was in the English language dub, as Orloff was placed in nineteenth century settings.

He was usually a contemporary figure in the Franco efforts, but here was introduced not unlike Count Dracula in Transylvania, with muttering villagers warning the hero against travelling to the castle of Orloff, and when he finally arrives being met with a wall of obfuscation that eventually breaks when the Professor demonstrates his proudest creation: an invisible man! Who appears to be purely used as a waiter, moving objects from one surface to another, so that was well worth the effort, wasn't it? Who needs to be reminded of boring old humanity when you could have your drinks served as if there was nobody there at all? Naturally, or unnaturally, the filmmakers were not going to be content with leaving it at that.

If you had seen Paul Verhoeven's Hollow Man you would have some notion of what the invisible menace was going to get up to here, though not before we had a lengthy flashback where Orloff regaled the doc with how he had come about the scientific trickery to manufacture the unseen manservant. Here we saw an explanation of why his daughter (Brigitte Carva, a one and done actress) was such a fragile specimen - she had been buried alive when mistakenly pronounced dead (so a spot of Edgar Allan Poe here as well as H.G. Wells), or placed in the family crypt at any rate, where two of Orloff's staff, the ugly bloke who tends to his grounds and the woman the ugly bloke lusts after and wishes to make his wife, raided it for her jewellery. They were rumbled pretty quickly, and you think said bloke was made into the invisible man.

But there you would be wrong, and indeed when the big reveal of what the invisible man looked like finally arrived, it was, shall we say, not what we were anticipating - let's just say he's not an actual man, or not a conventional one anyway. But before that director Pierre Chevalier had to fathom a method of parting his three main actresses with their clothes: the audience had shown up for sleaze, so that's what they were going to get, by Jove. Maria the sparklers coveter was seen changing clothes (twice!) then her dress falls open when Orloff whips her (so sadomasochism could be added to the list), the maid was stripped and actually raped by the invisible, er, "man" which involved a ludicrous scene of the actress rolling around on a bed of hay and looking anguished (the effects budget didn't stretch to anything further, apparently), and finally poor old Brigitte has her clothes ripped off during the grand finale, apropos of nothing except trying to keep the viewers awake. Even for an hour and a quarter of movie, there was precious little here of substance, real bargain basement stuff solely for the seasoned aficionado of tat. Music by Camille Sauvage.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1448 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
  Lee Fiveash
  Mick Stewart
Enoch Sneed
  Dsfgsdfg Dsgdsgsdg
   

 

Last Updated: