HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
True Don Quixote, The
Babymother
Mitchells vs. the Machines, The
Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Unholy, The
How to Deter a Robber
Antebellum
Offering, The
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
   
 
Newest Articles
Truth Kills: Blow Out on Blu-ray
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
   
 
  John Wick: Chapter 2 The Invincible Man
Year: 2017
Director: Chad Stahelski
Stars: Keanu Reeves, Riccardo Scamarcio, Ian McShane, Ruby Rose, Common, Claudia Gerini, Lance Reddick, Laurence Fishburne, Tobias Segal, John Leguizamo, Bridget Moynahan, Thomas Sadowski, David Patrick Kelly, Franco Nero, Peter Serafinowicz, Peter Stormare
Genre: Action, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: John Wick (Keanu Reeves) wanted revenge, and he got it. The gangster who killed the dog his wife gave to him before she died has paid a heavy price, as has everyone associated with him, but John still wants his car back. He knows it is kept in a warehouse/garage in the middle of town, but there are plans in place to prevent him from retrieving it; after following a biker along the streets in a high-speed chase, Wick ends up at the building in question and makes his way in, beating up anyone who gets in his way as the brother (Peter Stormare) of the mob boss he has just killed contemplates pursuing the feud or letting his adversary have his car after all. Wick does get behind the wheel, and smashes up the vehicle in his attempt to leave - but he does prevail.

And therein lay the appeal of the John Wick movies, simply sitting back and watching Keanu destroy a shower of bastards was enough to float the boats of many a seasoned action flick fan, although for the uninitiated the sense of "what, is that it?" was difficult to shake. There was a scene about half an hour in where our bloodied but unbowed hero set about tooling up for a job he had been forced to take, and it was presented like the sequence in Pretty Woman where Richard Gere takes Julia Roberts to all those swanky emporia to deck her out in the most immaculate outfits possible. It all said to the viewer, why yes, this is an experience for the connoisseur, we have pushed the boat out for this one.

As the title suggested, this was the second part in a trilogy which had revealed just how much Reeves had been underestimated, even taken for granted, and how audiences had woken up to precisely what a treasure he was. Not only was he seemingly defying all effects of ageing into his fifties, but stories of his kindness and generosity were now becoming common knowledge, and most importantly his place as a protagonist in action movies was growing more assured as even those who would not class themselves as fans would note what a boon he had been to the genre thanks to his dedication to being as good as he could be in those roles. His acting may have been nothing to write home about, but his physicality was undeniable and impressive.

In this manner you could trace the lineage from the action heroes from the seventies onwards, that was the performers who specialised in that format, right up to Reeves: Charles Bronson, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Jason Statham, those actors with a limited range but a definite presence and ability to carry themselves into the danger that the scripts conjured up for them. Yet somehow Reeves stood apart, thanks to what amounted to a goofy sense of humour in some work and a spiritual aspect in others, making it tempting to class him as a minor icon since there was nobody in his style who was exactly like him. John Wick was a perfect part, and had obviously been tailor made to his strengths, for his dialogue was minimal, and director Chad Stahelski and screenwriter Derek Kolstad served up an abundance of reasons for their star to use his body instead of his voice. That duo were well aware of the history of the genre, hence the cast list was dotted with faces fans of such movies would be very glad to see.

Ian McShane was back as the owner of the hotel which is neutral ground for a seemingly global network of assassins and gangsters who it increasingly looked as if Wick would have to take on instead of retiring, as was Lance Reddick as the enigmatic concierge: give actors like that weaponry and they would not be out of place in the mayhem, yet the film was content with their unspoken charisma. Then there was the pleasure of seeing Franco Nero or Laurence Fishburne show up in short but welcome sequences, bringing with them the import of an entire career, with relative newcomers such as Ruby Rose also ingenious casting given what they could bring to the screen. Maybe the theme that made the first movie special, the loss of love that made Wick rely on himself and no one else, was lacking, but we could appreciate why he was so isolated and single minded nevertheless - it was in every moment of every scene Reeves was in, those stretches where he got to defend himself against an onslaught paramount in that. More of the same, perhaps, but it was sleek and classy for a fantasy about down and dirty murder. Music by Tyler Bates and Joel J. Richard.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2208 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: