HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Great White
Spy Who Came in from the Cold, The
Raya and the Last Dragon
Letter from Paris
Behind the Mask
Lucky
Matrix, The
Undergods
Betrayed
Fried Barry
Once Upon a River
Cowboys
Atlantis
We Still Say Grace
Enfant Terrible
Nomadland
Playboy of the Western World, The
Bike Thief, The
Threshold
Virtuoso, The
Here are the Young Men
Beast Beast
Labyrinth of Cinema
Justice Society: World War II
Artist's Wife, The
Truman & Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation
Pusher III
Palm Springs
Devil Commands, The
Oak Room, The
Pusher II
Forget Everything and Run
Secrets & Lies
Red Moon Tide
Man with Nine Lives, The
Pusher
Pot Carriers, The
Black Bear
Don't Cry, Pretty Girls!
Portal
   
 
Newest Articles
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
   
 
  Come Play With Me Nudity Required
Year: 1977
Director: George Harrison Marks
Stars: Alfie Bass, George Harrison Marks, Irene Handl, Ronald Fraser, Tommy Godfrey, Sue Longhurst, Ken Parry, Cardew Robinson, Suzy Mandel, Mary Millington, Rita Webb, Bob Todd, Henry McGee, Talfryn Thomas, Milton Reid, Anna Bergman, Valentine Dyall
Genre: Comedy, Sex, TrashBuy from Amazon
Rating:  2 (from 2 votes)
Review: The Deputy Prime Minister (Henry McGee) has called a meeting about a pressing problem - the country is on the verge of being swamped with forged banknotes and something must be done. Examining the pattern of forgery crime on the map, he thinks that the situation is moving from North to South, and will soon be past London. Meanwhile, the forgers, Kelly (Alfie Bass) and Clapworthy (George Harrison Marks) have dared to escape from the grip of the gangsters employing them with the plates they use to craft the fake money with, and end up hiding out in Scotland, specifically the Bovington Manor owned by Lady Bovington (Irene Handl) which she is hoping to turn into a health farm. But they're about to get visitors in the shape of some out of work strippers, who will spice up life at the manor house...

Surely the most successful of the British sex comedies of the seventies, Come Play With Me was scripted by the director and co-star Marks, presumably stamping his personality all over the film. Probably the last of such hits (can you call it the end of an era?), in amongst the getting-on-a-bit professional cast members there was one star who would become the movie's chief selling point: Mary Millington. Which would be a cheat to her fans, as she's barely in the film, and only has one set piece where she administers a massage to one of the clients. As Mary committed suicide a couple of years after making the film, you would have thought this would render the production hard to enjoy, but no matter as even if she were still alive today, it would be difficult to fathom much entertainment value.

Seedy and desperate are the best words to describe the film. However, the publicity surrounding it would have had the prospective punters believe that it was the next Deep Throat, when in reality it was strictly softcore, not much different from a monumentally overstretched Benny Hill sketch with added nudity. This didn't stop the film running for four whole years in London cinemas, but watching it now you wonder how hard up for titillation the British public were at the time (or the men of the British public, at any rate). Also pretty hard up are the cast, featuring such past their prime comic actors as Bass (dressed up to look like Oliver Hardy, for some reason) and Handl (seeming as though she couldn't care less about the script) all awkwardly reciting their lines and obviously forgetting them, too.

With the nudity crowbarred in, the intervening plot makes the hour and a half running time feel more like half a day. Lady Bovington's nephew arrives with a busload of strippers, who obviously weren't hired for their thespian skills, and they have the bright idea of getting the health farm going. As all this is happening, the head gangster (Ronald Fraser) is sending out minions to search for Kelly and Clapworthy, but spends all his time at his strip club for the excuse, as if they needed it, of adding the spectacle of more strippers (one of whom covers herself with shaving foam - it takes all sorts). He's not the only one on the hunt for the forgers, as a supremely unfunny government minister calling himself "Q" (Ken Parry) is roaming around the south of England in the hope of finding them too.

The comedy is miserable all over, and the performing epitomises the term "half hearted". Blatantly low budget, it has you contemplating why they felt the need to add any story or jokes at all, when all the audiences would want to see would be the naked women. You can't imagine anyone laughing out loud at any of it, unless it was a nervous reaction to boredom. To brighten things up, terrible rock songs are played by a band who happened to be aboard the bus, and in a moment of stunning gall, Marks includes a jolly musical number presented by him and Bass accompanied by the young ladies, crooning, "It's Great to be Here!" which it quite plainly isn't. When things are getting slow, which is most of the time, Marks throws naked women into the scenes, but they're so flatly handled that no matter how many massages are included tedium can't help but set in early on. How did this run for four years? Presumably it was all that was on offer. Music by Peter Jeffries.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 26064 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (1)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Desbris M
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: