HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
True Don Quixote, The
Babymother
Mitchells vs. the Machines, The
Dora and the Lost City of Gold
Unholy, The
How to Deter a Robber
Antebellum
Offering, The
Enola Holmes
Big Calamity, The
Man Under Table
Freedom Fields
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  New Centurions, The Cop Out
Year: 1972
Director: Richard Fleischer
Stars: George C. Scott, Stacy Keach, Jane Alexander, Scott Wilson, Rosalind Cash, Erik Estrada, Clifton James, Richard E. Kalik, James Sikking, Beverly Hope Atkinson, Mittie Lawrence, Isabel Sanford, Carol Speed, Tracy Lyles, Burke Byrnes
Genre: Drama, ThrillerBuy from Amazon
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: Fresh out of police academy, Roy Fehler (Stacy Keach) joins a batch of young officers guided by seasoned cop Kilvinski (George C. Scott). Tough but compassionate, Kilvinski schools the rookies how to survive on the crime-ridden streets of L.A. but also how to deal justice with a fair hand. As time passes, despite sustaining a near-fatal injury while trying to stop a liquor store robbery, Roy grows increasingly addicted to the thrill of working the streets. Though it takes a toll on Roy's relationship with his wife Dorothy (Jane Alexander), he finds hope through a new relationship with kindly nurse Lorrie (Rosalind Cash). Yet the cops face an uphill battle and Roy discovers the one thing even Kilvinski can't quite manage is sustain a sane, fulfilling life away from the job.

Currently available under the unwieldy alternate title Precinct 45: Los Angeles Police (1972), The New Centurions is a comparatively unsung though in retrospect important entry in the Seventies cycle of gritty cop thrillers. Genre landmarks like Bullitt (1968) and Dirty Harry (1971) drew their crime-busting cops as icons of cool but The New Centurions sought to put a human face on the badge. The film was adapted from the 1971 bestseller penned by Joseph Wambaugh, a real-life cop on the force for fourteen years. In fact Wambaugh was still working as detective when his book topped the bestseller charts and in interviews noted with wry amusement he had suspects in cuffs asking for his autograph. He remained a staple of the true-crime genre in print and on film. Five years later Robert Aldrich adapted another Wambaugh novel, The Choirboys (1977) as a movie the author found so reprehensible he went on to personally script a subsequent work, The Onion Field (1979) to great acclaim. Also worth mentioning is The Glitter Dome (1984), an exposé of the seedy side of Hollywood with a great teaming of James Garner and John Lithgow as detectives investigating the porn industry.

Screenwriter Stirling Silliphant translates Wambaugh's novel into a heavily episodic though vivid movie with memorable scenes recreating the author's real-life experiences. Among the most powerful are the moment Gus (Scott Wilson) shoots an innocent African-American man, an incident that sadly remains all too timely, Kilvinski loses his temper with a sleazy landlord exploiting Mexican immigrants, and an especially harrowing and well-acted scene involving a woman found abusing her baby. In a somewhat lighter vein one of the more likable sequences details how Kilvinski and Fehler arrest a gaggle of African-American hookers only to buy them some booze and let them go after listening to them swap outrageous stories. Interwoven with these incidents is an ongoing ethical debate as Kilvinski and Fehler ponder the futility of their jobs. Although it could be argued the base argument is no different from the one put forward in Dirty Harry (the law sees only crime and criminals, cops deal with victims), Kilvinski tempers his fierce street survival instincts with a compassionate, humane attitude to victims and small-time crooks alike.

Viewers who have sat through umpteen films with an idealistic rookie paired with a cynical, no-nonsense veteran may well groan but Fehler and Kilvinski emerge a great deal more complex and faceted than their cookie-cutter descriptions might sound. Kilvinski is ultimately far more vulnerable and uncertain than his hard-boiled exterior suggests while Fehler is thoughtful, articulate and even-tempered. Initially Fehler is a law student working only to put himself through college and support his wife and child. Yet he comes to love working the streets to the point where he more or less destroys what remains of his life outside the force. Stacy Keach and the great George C. Scott, reuniting with director Richard Fleischer after The Last Run (1971), deliver affecting, naturalistic performances. The film also features outstanding character work from the then-fresh-faced likes of Ed Lauter, Scott Wilson, future C*H*I*P*S star Erik Estrada and a very young William Atherton. Also look out for Roger E. Mosely, later helicopter pilot T.C. on Magnum, P.I. and Clifton James who went on to portray a very different kind of police officer, Sheriff J.W. Pepper in the James Bond films Live and Let Die (1973) and The Man with the Golden Gun (1975).

An often-underrated filmmaker as at ease with colourful fantasy and science fiction as with grittier thrillers, Richard Fleischer returns to the grainy, downbeat fly-on-the-wall semi-documentary style that characterized his true-crime films (e.g. The Boston Strangler (1968), 10 Rillington Place (1970)). While not as radical as the groundbreaking realism William Friedkin brought to The French Connection (1971), it is still a pretty sobering approach. Although The New Centurions is cynical about the policeman's life it is not satirical nor anti-establishment. The film acknowledges the presence of racism, homophobia, misogyny and excessive violence but its sympathies remain with the police officers who remain the good guys while the criminals, although morally shaded, are still the bad guys. As a narrative it is rather formless in a very Seventies way. Unlike other Seventies crime films the bleak, depressing, claustrophobic nature of its inherent message does not really stem from a drive for social change but merely exasperation and futility.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 2266 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Richard Fleischer  (1916 - 2006)

American director whose Hollywood career spanned five decades. The son of famed animator Max Fleischer, he started directing in the forties, and went on to deliver some stylish B-movies such as Armored Car Robbery and Narrow Margin. His big break arrived with Disney's hit live action epic, 20,000 Leagues under the Sea, and which he followed up with such films as The Vikings, Compulsion, Fantastic Voyage, The Boston Strangler, true crime story 10 Rillington Place, See No Evil, cult favourite Soylent Green, Mister Majestyk, Amityville 3-D and sequel Conan the Destroyer. He became unfairly well known for his critical flops, too, thanks to Doctor Dolittle, Che!, Mandingo, The Jazz Singer remake, Red Sonja and Million Dollar Mystery, some of which gained campy cult followings, but nevertheless left a solid filmography to be proud of.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: