HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Settlers
Boy Behind the Door, The
Swords of the Space Ark
I Still See You
Most Beautiful Boy in the World, The
Luz: The Flower of Evil
Human Voice, The
Guns Akimbo
Being a Human Person
Giants and Toys
Millionaires Express
Bringing Up Baby
World to Come, The
Air Conditioner
Fear and Loathing in Aspen
Kandisha
Riders of Justice
Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Maki, The
For Those Who Think Young
Justice League: War
Fuzzy Pink Nightgown, The
Plurality
Scooby-Doo! Moon Monster Madness
Night of the Sharks
Werewolves Within
Honeymoon
King and Four Queens, The
Stray Dolls
Diana's Wedding
Deerskin
Toll, The
Two of Us
Nowhere Special
Rainbow Jacket, The
Crazy Samurai: 400 vs 1
First Cow
Undiscovered Tomb
Being Frank
Occupation: Rainfall
Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc
   
 
Newest Articles
A Monument to All the Bullshit in the World: 1970s Disaster Movies
Take Care with Peanuts: Interview with Melissa Menta (SVP of Marketing)
Silent is Golden: Futtocks End... and Other Short Stories on Blu-ray
Winner on Losers: West 11 on Blu-ray
Freewheelin' - Bob Dylan: Odds and Ends on Digital
Never Sleep: The Night of the Hunter on Blu-ray
Sherlock vs Ripper: Murder by Decree on Blu-ray
That Ol' Black Magic: Encounter of the Spooky Kind on Blu-ray
She's Evil! She's Brilliant! Basic Instinct on Blu-ray
Hong Kong Dreamin': World of Wong Kar Wai on Blu-ray
Buckle Your Swash: The Devil-Ship Pirates on Blu-ray
Way of the Exploding Fist: One Armed Boxer on Blu-ray
A Lot of Growing Up to Do: Fast Times at Ridgemont High on Blu-ray
Oh My Godard: Masculin Feminin on Blu-ray
Let Us Play: Play for Today Volume 2 on Blu-ray
Before The Matrix, There was Johnny Mnemonic: on Digital
More Than Mad Science: Karloff at Columbia on Blu-ray
Indian Summer: The Darjeeling Limited on Blu-ray
3 from 1950s Hollyweird: Dr. T, Mankind and Plan 9
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
   
 
  What's Good for the Goose Norman's Conquest
Year: 1969
Director: Menahem Golan
Stars: Norman Wisdom, Sally Geeson, Sarah Atkinson, Sally Bazely, Stuart Nichol, Derek Francis, Terence Alexander, Paul Whitsun-Jones, David Lodge, Karl Lanchbury, Hilary Pritchard, H.H. Goldsmith, Thelma Falls-Hand, George Meaton
Genre: Comedy, DramaBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: Timothy Bartlett (Norman Wisdom) is an assistant manager of a bank, and for him every day, excepting weekends, is much the same, he gets up, has breakfast, kisses the wife and kids goodbye then it's off to the office to see about various clients and their accounts before returning home to eat his dinner, read the newspaper then go to bed before starting the cycle again. However, one day when he is at work, the manager himself collapses and has to be taken to hospital, but the last thing he says to Timothy is that he must attend a conference in his stead, and ever-dutiful, the assistant agrees. He packs the next day, his wife Margaret (Sally Bazely) makes him sandwiches and a flask of tea, and on he goes - to a life-changing experience.

Remember that episode of Star Trek where Mr Spock jammed on his harp with the space hippies? Or maybe that episode of The Frost Programme where interviewer David Frost met the yippies and Felix Dennis said the C word as the show spiralled out of control? Pop culture is full of incidents like that where one set of values is challenged by a new set and it seems like a changing of the guard is in effect, and Britain's biggest comedy star of the fifties and to an extent the sixties had that moment as well, only hardly anyone went to watch it. What's Good for the Goose saw Norman Wisdom, apparently energised by receiving excellent notices for his performance in The Night They Raided Minsky's, a more adult enterprise than he had appeared in previously, appear in this.

Oddly enough, Norman's brush with youth culture was closer to Frost's than it was everyone's favourite Vulcan, as there were some saucy elements added to the mix to illustrate how cutting edge he was now. That this effort buried his film career decisively should give you some idea of how well he pulled that off, not gracing the big screen until his supporting role in Double X some twenty-three years later, if anything an even worse film than this one, but there was another name attached to the credits which may not have made these Goose shenanigans as surprising as you might have anticipated. Step forward Menahem Golan, future controller of Cannon Films, those eighties purveyors of would-be blockbusting trash, here making an early move into the market.

Quite how he wound up partnered with Wisdom must be quite a story, but typical for Golan there was a sleaze aspect as he not only persuaded the star to appear in scenes with a nude Sally Geeson, but Norm got his kit off as well, though with one eye on the Continental market most of this was left out of the British and American release, though that did not stop us getting a look at his arse as he and Sal frolic naked on a freezing-looking Southport beach. What could have brought this favourite of the nation's children to such a mid-life crisis so publicly depicted? He was evidently trying to move with the times, and his brand of slapstick and sentimentality was difficult to adapt to a landscape where the mood was more lax in its censorship, and frankly smutty in its comedy.

Wisdom disliked that sort of blue humour, so the next best thing he could think up, and he had a hand in the production and the writing too, was to place him in a culture clash as Timothy picks up a couple of hitchhikers (Geeson and Sarah Atkinson) on his way to the conference and gets to like their company, perhaps understandably preferring it to the stuffy men in suits that he has to put up with every day. This is where the girls bring him to a nightclub called The Screaming Apple (!) where they teach him to groove to the strains of The Pretty Things, who genuinely were a cool band though they might have been relieved that this movie flopped and the audience to watch them share the screen with the considerably more mainstream Wisdom was meagre. Soon one thing leads to another and he has committed adultery, such a no-no that he suffers nothing but heartache until he reconciles with the oblivious Margaret, and thus the status quo was re-established, leaving Timothy a little older and wiser and the laughs noticeably absent. It was more like a drama, even when Wisdom added a spot of the old slapstick; a curious experience and a little sad, both intentionally and otherwise. Norman sang the catchy but naff theme song, too.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2459 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Desbris M
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
   

 

Last Updated: