HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
 
Newest Reviews
Jules Verne's Rocket to the Moon
Man They Could Not Hang, The
Final Days
Frightened City, The
Assimilate
Sequin in a Blue Room
Common Crime, A
Into the Labyrinth
Power, The
Wake of Death
Night Orchid
Mortal
Iron Mask, The
Dinosaur
Personal History of David Copperfield, The
Dove, The
Collective
Charulata
Minari
Violation
Defending Your Life
Champagne Murders, The
He Dreams of Giants
Lost in America
Take Back
Honeydew
Banishing, The
Drifters, The
Gushing Prayer
Escape from Coral Cove
Swan Princess, The
Shortcut
Stray
Butterfly Murders, The
Pimp
Feedback
Lady is a Square, The
Zack Snyder's Justice League
Dark Rendezvous
Silk Road
   
 
Newest Articles
Meiko Kaji's Girl Gangs: Stray Cat Rock on Arrow
Having a Wild Weekend: Catch Us If You Can on Blu-ray
The Drifters: Star Lucie Bourdeu Interview
Meiko Kaji Behind Bars: Female Prisoner Scorpion on Arrow
The Horror of the Soviets: Viy on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Tarka the Otter and The Belstone Fox
Network Double Bills: All Night Long and Ballad in Blue
Chew Him Up and Spit Him Out: Romeo is Bleeding on Blu-ray
British Body Snatchers: They Came from Beyond Space on Blu-ray
Bzzzt: Pulse on Blu-ray
The Tombs Will Be Their Cities: Demons and Demons 2 on Arrow
Somebody Killed Her Husband: Charade on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Maroc 7 and Invasion
Network Double Bills: The Best of Benny Hill and The Likely Lads
Network Double Bills: Some Girls Do and Deadlier Than the Male
Absolutely Bananas: Link on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Hawk the Slayer and The Medusa Touch
The Price of Plague: The Masque of the Red Death on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Seance on a Wet Afternoon and Ring of Spies
Chaney Chillers: Inner Sanctum Mysteries - The Complete Film Series on Blu-ray
Adelphi Extras: Stars in Your Eyes on Blu-ray
Toons for the Heads: Fantastic Planet and Adult Animation
Nature Girl: The New World on Blu-ray
Network Double Bills: Perfect Friday and Robbery
Network Double Bills: The House in Nightmare Park and The Man Who Haunted Himself
   
 
  Trainwreck Bad Company
Year: 2015
Director: Judd Apatow
Stars: Amy Schumer, Bill Hader, Brie Larson, Tilda Swinton, LeBron James, Colin Quinn, John Cena, Vanessa Bayer, Jon Glaser, Randall Park, Ezra Miller, Mike Birbiglia, Method Man, Norman Lloyd, Dave Attell, Daniel Radcliffe, Marisa Tomei, Matthew Broderick
Genre: Comedy, RomanceBuy from Amazon
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: Amy Townsend (Amy Schumer) is a magazine journalist at a publication called S'Nuff, and it’s a high powered job that requires a lot of attitude to appeal to its readership, so is she up to that? She can talk the talk, or write the article at least, but her personal life is lacking a certain joie de vivre when the time she spends away from her desk is spent drinking and sleeping around. Her father (Colin Quinn), when he left her mother, made the point that people just are not meant to stay together, and Amy took that to heart given her relationships begin and end in one night more often than not. She is going out with a bodybuilder called Steven (John Cena), but one thing she doesn’t want to do is settle down like her sister Kim (Brie Larson)...

Amy Schumer was one of those talents who all of a sudden was everywhere, publicised across the world when her television series and film arrived on the scene at the same time. This over-familiarity with someone not many had been aware of before bred a degree of contempt in those resistant to her charms, but the truth was she was witty and funny, her earthy humour seasoned with a welcome degree of self-deprecation. So why was it Trainwreck, her collaboration with comedy super-producer Judd Apatow, was such a bore? The frustrating thing was that there was a fizzy little ninety minute movie in here somewhere, yet for the most part it was lost in over two hours of bloat.

On the surface, it didn’t seem as if Schumer was doing anything wrong, the persona crafted for her here apparently well-suited to her style, but the early warning signs were most probably lying with her director Apatow. He favoured improvisation, which meant the lines she had written in her own script were trampled on by his insistence that his cast should ignore them and basically make shit up, which not everyone can do successfully no matter how much encouragement and support they were receiving. Even a one-hundred-year-old Norman Lloyd was coaxed into inventing random jokes which you had to admire him for giving it a game try, but the fact remained most of this sounded too loose and baggy, particularly when the cast resorted to tired smut in lieu of anything imaginative.

A lot more snap would have offset Schumer’s antics, though even then her supposed "trainwreck" qualities were soothed by the love of a good man, leaving us with a character better off in an eighties sitcom where she would go on a journey and learn something by the end of the story, though if it had been an episode like that it would have thankfully been over in twenty-five minutes rather than subjecting us to a dispiritingly predictable romance. Again, the comedienne was a likeable presence, as was Bill Hader as Aaron, the sports doctor who wins Amy's heart, but ten minutes would go by and you would realise you hadn’t been laughing, and what laughing you had done was a mild chuckle.

Apatow littered the film with famous faces, though some more recognisable to American audiences than international ones, and left us with Matthew Broderick and Chris Evert sharing the silver screen for the first time, not that it was funny, it was more stuff shovelled in to bulk out an already patience-testing experience. After the first hour this had become like getting into a conversation with someone who won’t stop going on about themselves and their terrible relationships, only you couldn't get a word in edgeways to protest you really were not interested in hearing about this person in such deadening detail. Plus the manner that Amy's bad decisions resolved themselves told us rather conservatively and sentimentally that all she needed was a boring, safe man to be the rock in her life, as far away from her unintentionally damaging father as possible; when that drew up to a finale that should have been cute but even that went on for far too long, the phrase brevity is the soul of wit never was more appropriate. Music by Jon Brion.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2007 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star probably has psychic powers?
Laurence Fishburne
Nicolas Cage
Anya Taylor-Joy
Patrick Stewart
Sissy Spacek
Michelle Yeoh
Aubrey Plaza
Tom Cruise
Beatrice Dalle
Michael Ironside
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
  Paul Tuersley
  Chris Garbutt
  Sdfadf Rtfgsdf
Stately Wayne Manor
   

 

Last Updated: