HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
To the Stars
Lady Godiva Rides Again
Angelfish
Ben-Hur: A Tale of the Christ
Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, A
This is a Hijack
Loved One, The
Jumanji: The Next Level
Krabi 2562
Call of the Wild, The
Diary of a Country Priest
Sea Fever
Throw Down
Grudge, The
Green Man, The
Specialists, The
Convoy
Romantic Comedy
Going Ape!
Rabid
Infinite Football
Little Women
Camino Skies
Ema
Another Shore
Cry Havoc
Legend of the Stardust Brothers, The
Mystery Team
Westward the Women
Demonwarp
Man Who Killed Don Quixote, The
Chloe
Jojo's Bizarre Adventure
Murder Inferno
Extraction
Overlanders, The
Can You Keep a Secret?
Women in Revolt
Astronaut
Peanut Butter Falcon, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Who Watched The Watchmen?
The Golden Age of Colonic Irrigation: Monty Python Series 4 on Blu-ray
Lady of Pleasure: Lola Montes on Blu-ray
Take You to the Gay Bar: Funeral Parade of Roses on Blu-ray
Hit for Ms: Mark Cousins' Women Make Film on Blu-ray
Look Sinister: The 1000 Eyes of Dr. Mabuse on Blu-ray
Star Wars Triple Threat: The Tricky Third Prequel and Sequel
I Can See for Miles: The Man with the X-Ray Eyes on Blu-ray
Too Much Pressure: The Family Way on Blu-ray
The Alan Key: Alan Klein and What a Crazy World on Blu-ray
A Japanese Ghost Story: Kwaidan on Blu-ray
The Zu Gang: Zu Warriors from the Magic Mountain on Blu-ray
Reality TV: The Year of the Sex Olympics on DVD
The Young and the Damned: They Live By Night on Blu-ray
Mind How You Go: The Best of COI on Blu-ray
Der Kommissar's in Town: Babylon Berlin Series 3 on DVD
The End of Civilisation as We Know It: The 50th Anniversary
The Whalebone Box: The Andrew Kotting Interview
Being Human: The Elephant Man on 4K UHD Blu-ray
It's! Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 3 on Blu-ray
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
   
 
  Nocturna Queen Of The Night
Year: 1979
Director: Harry Hurwitz
Stars: Nai Bonet, John Carradine, Yvonne De Carlo, Brother Theodore, Sy Richardson, Antony Hamilton, Ivery Bell, Michael Harrison, Norris Harris, William H. Jones Jr, Adam Keefe, Monica Tidwell, Tony Sanchez, Thomas Ryan, Al Sapienza, Jerry Sroka, Irwin Keyes
Genre: Horror, Comedy, Trash, Romance, MusicBuy from Amazon
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Nocturna (Nai Bonet) is the granddaughter of Count Dracula (John Carradine) himself, residing with him in their castle-turned-hotel in Transylvania along with various others, such as their werewolf manservant Theodore (Brother Theodore). He lusts after Nocturna and is often inviting her on moonlight hunts with him, but she always turns him down, causing him no end of aggravation, so he is reduced to spying on her in lieu of getting as close to her as he would actually like. But romance is something she has not ruled out, and as she sits listening to the latest soul band the hotel has booked for their evening dances, her attention is caught by the handsome guitarist Jimmy (Antony Hamilton)...

A curious item that may well have been a vanity project for its star Nai Bonet, this arrived at a point in Western culture when everything was turning disco, with seemingly every celebrity who could carry a tune, and quite a number who couldn't, bringing out their own records to cash in on the craze, and no variety show on television without their disco interlude. It somehow epitomised the trashy, glitzy way things had gone, with the superficial reigning across the world, as if there was nothing that couldn't be coped with when you were able to go out dancing at a club for a whole evening - that would make it all better. Yet surprisingly the movies were not quite as fast to latch onto disco.

Which meant aside from the occasional big hit like Saturday Night Fever (exactly like that, in fact) there wasn't a whole rash of disco flicks, leaving the heavy lifting to the exploitation side of the business. Nocturna was one of those, produced by Bonet and she contributed the storyline too as well as starring in the title role, one of two efforts she oversaw to feature herself in the lead (the other was grindhouse gangster drama Hoodlums). This was the one you'd be more likely to see, but even as John Carradine's last outing as Count Dracula it wasn't exactly high profile, something to seek out rather than have it come to you. Yvonne De Carlo was there too, cashing in on her Munsters fame as Jugulia, a partner for Drac who we last see climbing into a double coffin with him.

There were jokes, but they weren't hilarious, with the Count putting in his fanged dentures to lament his aged state (and Carradine's arthritis-twisted hands were difficult to ignore, they really looked painful) for most of his screen time and Brother Theodore's patented doom and gloom aggressive comedy delivered with rather too much venom, as if he was genuinely aggrieved about what his career had taken him to (famously, he had never gotten over his World War II experiences which left him destitute and informed his bleak humour). That said, his Shakespeare line was about the only bit that was funny in the whole thing, as Bonet seemed more interested in dancing, so great swathes of the running time were given over to twelve inch mixes of the soundtrack's tunes.

As all the while Nocturna boogies on down, finding disco is the only thing that will cure the vampirism she is growing tired of, even seeing her reflection for the first time after a bout of grooving. Her new beau was strictly there as eye candy for Bonet to ogle, Antony Hamilton a former dancer himself and model in his day job, though he would go on to a bunch of television appearances before his premature death from an AIDS-related illness. If that makes his role here poignant, that translates to the rest of it as a bygone era of hedonism before it seemed the party was over and the likes of Nai were forced to retire from the scene; here, in spite of showing up in a few movies before this, she demonstrated why she never made the grade as far as stardom went. She certainly had the look, yet her acting was limited to say the least, and she was better suited to the tacked-on sequence where she poses nude while bathing, sort of a less talented Barbara Carrera, with the discofied vampire trappings like blood cocaine and cartoon bats desperate touches to stay relevant and fun. It was dated even before it had a chance.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2015 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (2)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Enoch Sneed
  Hannah Prosser
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
  Rachel Franke
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: