HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Wind, The
Holly and the Ivy, The
Atlantique
Now, Voyager
Wolf's Call, The
Nostalghia
Nightingale, The
Eighth Grade
Irishman, The
Betrayed
Lords of Chaos
Operation Petticoat
Dead Don't Die, The
On the Waterfront
Last Faust, The
Moonlighting
Art of Self-Defense, The
Ironweed
Booksmart
Prisoners
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
   
 
Newest Articles
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
   
 
  Night Moves The DambustersBuy this film here.
Year: 2013
Director: Kelly Reichardt
Stars: Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning, Peter Sarsgaard, Alia Shawkat, Logan Miller, Kai Lennox, Katherine Waterston, James LeGros, Traber Burns, Barry Del Sherman, Matt Malloy, Lew Temple, Nate Mooney, Jennifer Snook, Christopher Liam Moore, Kaiti Zemet
Genre: Drama, Thriller
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Josh (Jesse Eisenberg) is a man with a plan, but cannot work alone, even if in the long run it would have been better if he did. He believes wholeheartedly in environmentalism and would go to drastic lengths to protect the planet he regards as more important than any individual, unless that individual shares his views on direct action. His friend Dena (Dakota Fanning) has been brought into his radicalism, and she has offered to help as she too doesn't wish to listen to the meek opinions of those who would have it that the world is not saved by grand gestures but a collection of smaller projects, and so with the help of the older radical Harmon (Peter Sarsgaard) they are about to change the planet...

Or one part of the planet, specifically their small sphere of relationships, as well as the larger matter of blowing up a dam in the middle of an Oregon forest in director Kelly Reichardt's cautionary tale of what happens when the tenets you live by blind yourself to common sense and further than that, any sort of moral code that would have offered you some perspective, one which might have you observe you're a hypocrite if you claim to be working for the greater good when your actions cause destruction and even death, especially when you attribute those characteristics to your perceived enemies. Though it was not a film about the brand of terrorism most were worried about come the twenty-first century, it nevertheless found a universal message there.

That was more than "thou shalt not kill", though admittedly this was a major part of what the trio of environmentalists ignore when their obsession with their personal mission drowns out all reason, mostly because there is nobody in their lives they will listen to who would offer a counterargument to their actions of potential violence. That's as much a tragedy as what eventually happens, that there was no voice here they could take heed of - there was, but they chose to dismiss it since they believed in their delusions that this would be a sign of weakness. And so the tone of the story moves from responsibility - for being true to yourself and all you hold dear, and the planet's overall health - to guilt - when you realise what a fool you have been thanks to your lack of proportion - to finally abject paranoia.

Those points in that progression may not necessarily arrange themselves in that order for every misguided soul, but Reichardt found them the most powerful with such a sequence. Not that everyone found this impressive, as her slow, deliberate pace all the better to spell out the implications of what occurs was likely to turn off those expecting a high octane thriller for this material could have easily been adapted. In its way, Night Moves, not to be confused with the cult Gene Hackman thriller of the nineteen-seventies, though there were curious similarities in tone and structure, intentionally or otherwise, represented the dark side of another cult artifact of that decade forty years before, Edward Abbey's novel The Monkey Wrench Gang. There, the radical environmentalism was a lark.

A dangerous lark, but one summing up the counterculture mood of the era it was written, yet come the next millennium we could no longer rely on that sort of cut and dried, goodies versus baddies point of view since everything had gotten a lot more complicated. How to combat extremism when your neighbour could be the one with the crazy views, and more worryingly, the wherewithal to put them into force? The central trio here do not look like refugees from a Mad Max movie, they look perfectly normal yet here they are harbouring a mindset which will by and by see a lot of damage and loss of life. Eisenberg in particular was conveying a concealed rage you could just about detect, something easily mistaken for icy grumpiness at the modern malaise, yet in effect far more corrosive than that. When Dena begins to regret her behaviour, he cannot agree, in spite of their actions proving utterly futile as life goes on much as it had in the bigger picture, another warning for those who try to change the world then are written off as maniacs. Appropriately eerie music by Jeff Grace.

[Soda Pictures' Blu-ray looks crepuscular, as befits the cinematography, with such features as interviews with Reichardt and Eisenberg among the extensive extras.]
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1237 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: