HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Western Stars
League of Gentlemen, The
Higher Power
Shinsengumi
IT Chapter Two
Rich Kids
Arena
Glory Guys, The
Serial Killer's Guide to Life, A
Lovers and Other Strangers
Shiny Shrimps, The
Good Woman is Hard to Find, A
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Doctor at Sea
Spear
Death Cheaters
Wild Rose
Streetwalkin'
Mystify: Michael Hutchence
Devil's Playground, The
Cleanin' Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters
Hustlers
Mega Time Squad
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Souvenir, The
Birds of Passage
Ma
Woman at War
Happy as Lazzaro
Mickey's Christmas Carol
Marriage Story
Santa Claus is a Bastard
Star, The
Tom & Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale
Shadow
Christmas Carol, A
Legend of the Demon Cat
Adventures of Sinbad, The
Wounds
Love & Peace
   
 
Newest Articles
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
   
 
  Linguini Incident, The The Not So Great EscapeBuy this film here.
Year: 1991
Director: Richard Shepard
Stars: Rosanna Arquette, David Bowie, Eszter Balint, Andre Gregory, Buck Henry, Viveca Lindfors, Marlee Matlin, Eloy Casados, Michael Bonnabel, James Avery, Susan Meschner, Leana Hall, Maura Tierney, Kristina Loggia, Lewis Arquette, Iman, Julian Lennon
Genre: Comedy
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Lucy (Rosanna Arquette) is a waitress who works in a fancy restaurant in New York City, but what she really wants to do is something else, something more showbiz related. One of the bartenders there is Monte (David Bowie) who as far as she can tell from what he says to the other waitresses is an incorrigible liar, but one thing he is sincere about is wanting to get married. Not for love, but for his Green Card so he can earn American citizenship and not have to return to Britain where he claims his life is in danger, but a willing lady is difficult to find. Will Lucy oblige?

There is a linguini incident in The Linguini Incident, but it's merely mentioned in passing and has no bearing on the plot whatsoever, which should offer some idea of how the emphasis was on the quirky for Richard Shepard's movie, a work he disowned when it did not turn out the way he had hoped. It worked out OK for him, however, as he eventually had a hit with the hitman comedy The Matador, so at least he wasn't forced to leave the business when this was barely released and when it was seen, was regarded as so slight and fluffy that it would blow away in a stiff breeze, damned by its reliance on whimsy.

Shepard certainly had an interesting cast for his efforts, with Rosanna Arquette presumably hired to court comparisons with her earlier hit Desperately Seeking Susan - this little item really did feel like a film out of time, as if the director had sat on the script for five years or more likely had spent about that time or more trying to get the thing made. What David Bowie was doing there was anyone's guess, as he has usually been employed as far as films went to add a spot of otherworldly oddness to a cult film or example of the outré; here, on the other hand, he was a comedy character who as this turned out wasn't all that funny anyway, much like the rest of the movie.

Naturally, he still came across as strange to a degree, and he was given some bizarre dialogue to speak such as "I thought that rabbit was eating your head!" or "Why don't you take a match to my balls?" though you had to assume that was intended to be for a laugh or two. While this was amiable enough, you rarely got the impression this was a movie that vitally needed to be made or indeed watched, yet star fanciers would be interested to see Bowie and Arquette in leading roles together, especially the former as he was accustomed to playing in support aside from the occasional part. Added to that were Andre Gregory and Buck Henry as the nightclub owners who have Monte by the throat financially.

Those two tended to be wheeled on for more quirk every so often, but they were important to the plot in that they set in motion the escapology-themed grand finale. Lucy, you see, is intent on leaving waitressing behind to be the next Harry Houdini (female version), except when we first see her rehearsing she manages to tie herself up only to find it tricky to extricate herself from her bonds. Coincidentally, Monte phones her up the next morning asking her out for breakfast and she implores him for help, which he provides as long as she agrees to marry him, purely a business arrangement but they do end up handcuffed to the bed in a manner typical of the way the film flirts with kinkiness but does nothing with it. One thing leads to another, and somehow Monte has persuaded Lucy and her best friend Viv (singer-songwriter Eszter Balint) to rob the restaurant: take that, Pulp Fiction! There's more to it than that - Viveca Lindfors sells Houdini's ring, Marlee Matlin signs sarky comments - but somehow it seems like there's far less. Music by Thomas Newman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1520 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: