HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Attack of the Werewolves Let the fur flyBuy this film here.
Year: 2011
Director: Juan Martinez Moreno
Stars: Gorka Otxoa, Carlos Areces, Secun de la Rosa, Mabel Rivera, Manuel Manquiña, Luis Zahera, Cote Soler, Marcos Ruiz, Ramses
Genre: Horror, Comedy
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Struggling writer Tomás Mariño (Gorka Otxoa) returns to his ancestral village, Arga, where he hopes to start work on a new novel. It’s not long before he starts procrastinating, playing fetch with his cute little dog, Vito, and exploring his family’s old cobweb-ridden house where he is twice scared out of his wits. First by his childhood friend, Calisto (Carlos Areces), who leaps out of a closet, then by his scythe-wielding uncle Evaristo (Manuel Manquiña) who for reasons of his own has taken to dressing as a priest. One evening Tomás is joined by his crooked literary agent Mario (Secun de la Rosa), whereupon the pair are suddenly ambushed and bound onto wooden crosses by a mob of flaming torch-wielding peasants led by Evaristo. It so happens one hundred years ago, a gypsy curse befell the evil Marchioness of Mariño transforming her only son into a bloodthirsty werewolf that has preyed upon the villagers ever since. This curse can only be ended with the blood sacrifice of the last descendant of the Mariño family, which puts Tomás in a very unfortunate spot, caught between vengeful villagers and a rampaging werewolf. And then things get worse.

All cult horror genres seemingly follow the same cycle of innovation, imitation and eventual self-parody. A decade ago Spanish horror found favour with fans of subtle chills and darkly serious intent. Now in the wake of films like [REC]³ Genesis (2012), Witching and Bitching (2013) and writer-director Juan Martinez Moreno’s self-styled “una comedia bestial”, it seems Latin fright filmmakers are once again playing for laughs. This is nothing new. The cycle of garishly gory horror films from the Seventies spearheaded by the likes of Paul Naschy a.k.a. Jacinto Molina, Amando de Ossorio, José Ramon Larraz and others, preceded a slew of silly slapstick spoofs wherein many of these same auteurs contributed parodies. Interestingly however, Moreno - for whom this marks a change of pace from his last film, crime drama A Good Man (2009) - maintains Attack of the Werewolves is a tribute to the classic Universal horror films, which brings to mind a comment Paul Naschy once made about Spain forever denying its own horror tradition.

Known as Lobos de Arga in Spain and (somewhat confusingly) Game of Werewolves in the USA, this shares certain superficial similarities with Shaun of the Dead (2004) as it appears every horror comedy these days weaves some sort of allegory wherein a hapless man-child needs to grow up. However, the slight message about Tomás facing up to his responsibilities is quickly overshadowed by a more problematic agenda. There are no young people in Arga and the elderly residents clearly resent them for abandoning the decrepit village for the bright lights of the big cities. Moreno repeatedly hammers home this message as Calisto mentions all the young women left for Madrid, Tomás barely remembers the various neighbours and relatives he meets, and we discover the villagers have fed the werewolf all these years on stray tourists passing through. At no point does the film deliver any worthy riposte to the anti-youth argument with characters drawn as fairly feckless, self-serving imbeciles, though the central trio’s discovery of a feral youth named Diego (Marcos Ruiz) in an underground tunnel brings out their nobler impulses.

For a comedy it is mildly amusing rather than laugh-out-loud funny with too many scenes of straight nastiness plus a tendency to keep wheeling on additional characters that serve little purpose. Tomás feisty grandma (Mabel Rivera) rides to his rescue but only hangs around long enough to have her neck snapped, a couple of policemen - a cowardly youth (Cote Soler) and an older, more resourceful sergeant (Luis Zahera) (see what I mean?) - add equally little to the story save rendering ostensible hero Tomás increasingly redundant. After a promising start this devolves into a familiar siege scenario yet is often genuinely suspenseful despite an inconsistency in its werewolf lore and a weakness for dumb detours like the revelation Calisto once shagged a sheep. The werewolves themselves are pleasingly of the man-in-a-furry suit variety rather than the slapdash CGI prevalent these days and are pretty darn cool.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 1065 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: