HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Wind, The
Holly and the Ivy, The
Atlantique
Now, Voyager
Wolf's Call, The
Nostalghia
Nightingale, The
Eighth Grade
Irishman, The
Betrayed
Lords of Chaos
Operation Petticoat
Dead Don't Die, The
On the Waterfront
Last Faust, The
Moonlighting
Art of Self-Defense, The
Ironweed
Booksmart
Prisoners
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
   
 
Newest Articles
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
   
 
  Outlanders A swashbuckling sex romp through outer spaceBuy this film here.
Year: 1986
Director: Katsuhisa Yamada, Johji Manabe
Stars: Fumi Hirano, Mitsuo Iwata, Kenji Utsumi, Mari Yokoo, Akira Kamiya, Emi Shinohara, Mikio Terashima, Takashi Toyama
Genre: Sex, Animated, Science Fiction, Fantasy, Adventure
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: As an armada of unstoppable alien invaders bombard planet Earth from bug-shaped spaceships, teen photojournalist Tetsuya Wakatsuki (voiced by Mitsuo Iwata) happens upon scantily-clad space babe Princess Kahm (Fumi Hirano), slashing her sword through an entire army. Forced to defend himself, Tetsuya miraculously pins Kahm against a wall. He can’t help but gawp at her boobs. She is impressed with his erection. The next thing he knows, Tetsuya awakens aboard Kahm’s spaceship, attended by her kindly frog-like servants Nao (Akira Kamiya), Momo (Mika Doi) and hyperactive offspring Pon, Bon and Hon (Emi Shinohara).

Tetsuya discovers Kahm is heir to the Santavasku Interstellar Empire who regard Earth as their Sacred Planet and human beings as little more than an infestation of vermin. Now Kahm has chosen plucky Tetsuya as her mate she urges her father, the Emperor (Takashi Toyama), to spare the human race. Unfortunately, her plan backfires when the enraged Emperor orders Tetsuya’s immediate execution. Aided by comely cousin Battia (Mari Yokoo) and rakish wolf-like space commander Geobaldi (Kenji Utsumi), the (literally) star-crossed lovers attempt to escape the Emperor’s fleet and save the world.

In manga form Outlanders was among the first Japanese space epics embraced by American comic book fans. Most likely because creator Johji Manabe drew upon sources not too alien for mainstream English language readers: the fast-paced space action of Star Wars (1977), the carefree, kinky sexuality of Barbarella (1967), the swashbuckling pulp romance of the John Carter novels written by Edgar Rice Burroughs. Grandiose in scope, Manabe’s rollicking space opera ran the gamut from high tragedy to puerile sex comedy, incorporating global destruction, international conspiracies, ancient prophecies and love triangles. The anime version is more of a promotional item for the manga than a self-contained adaptation and omits several vital subplots. At forty-eight minutes, it can’t really do justice to Manabe’s sprawling multi-volume manga, but does a fair job capturing its frenetically fun tone.

Handsomely animated, this zips along at a fair clip in a frantic attempt to cram as much swordplay, space battles, strange monsters and weird sex as it possibly can, along with some intriguing ideas. For some critics, the pornographication of juvenalia is deeply troublesome, and bears comparison with what Michael Bay accomplished with Transformers (2007), although Manabe goes a step further than simply leering at a scantily-clad Megan Fox. In Japan however, this is a perfectly valid artistic choice. Manabe’s distinctive brew of strikingly designed insectoid warships, lovable Disneyesque anthropomorphic aliens, devil-horned nymphomaniac space princesses in battle bikinis, and quasi-bestial softcore porn offset by disarming moments of unexpected pathos, struck a chord with legions of horny Japanese adolescents who had only just grown interested in girls but were not ready to abandon silly sci-fi stuff just yet.

Crucially this is a sexploitation anime where the female characters are neither passive sex dolls nor victimised masturbatory aids. Instead, the likes of Kahm and Battia are kick-ass Amazonian heroines who actively enjoy their sex lives. Manabe leavens the salacious content with doses of genuine romance. Scenes where Tetsuya endures horrific injury to defend Kahm’s honour or where their love inspires other more conflicted characters to stand up for what is right, prove downright affecting. While not always coherent, the plot remains taut and exciting and even without concluding the story, still ends on a satisfactory note.

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 1079 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: