HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Harpoon
Great Northfield Minnesota Raid, The
Dark Phoenix
No Mercy
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
   
 
Newest Articles
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
   
 
  Supernova You Don't Have To Be A StarBuy this film here.
Year: 2000
Director: Walter Hill
Stars: James Spader, Angela Bassett, Robert Forster, Lou Diamond Phillips, Peter Facinelli, Robin Tunney, Wilson Cruz, Eddy Rice Jr, Knox White, Kerrigan Mahan, Vanessa Marshall
Genre: Horror, Science Fiction
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: It is the 22nd Century, and mankind has set off for the stars to explore way into deep space, which is where this medical rescue spacecraft is situated, its crew awaiting their next set of orders. Some pass the time by sleeping, others with ping-pong, others with sex, but there is a tension amongst them which goes largely unspoken, as if the experience of being out in the middle of nowhere is getting to them. To break the tedium, they receive a message from a solar system nearby, a distress call which they appear to be getting directly from the source: there's an emergency.

When it comes down to it, it's something of a minor miracle Supernova was made at all, let alone released. Given its Hellraiser in outer space premise hung around for so long (since the eighties, in fact) it was beaten to the punch by Event Horizon, it's little wonder nobody wanted more of the same not long afterwards, especially as the results already had the rumours abounding that not one person involved with it was happy about the way the film turned out. That in spite of director Walter Hill having a major role in the shoot, a fact hidden by the way he had his name taken off the credits to be replaced with "Thomas Lee", the first post-Alan Smithee alias.

Then there were further rumblings that Australian director Geoffrey Wright had stormed off the project before Hill had joined it in a rescue mission, and then Hill himself had stormed off when the studio were unhappy about the way it was going, leaving Francis Ford Coppola to step in, but really the overall impression remained that everyone wanted to forget about the whole thing. The public were only too happy to oblige, as it was snuck out into cinemas with little fanfare, then home video with even less effect, and by this stage hardly anyone would know what Supernova was, other than the hardcore science fiction aficionado who was attracted by, you know, spaceships and shit.

Actually, when it was finally finished (and even then there were a couple of versions to see), what it most resembled was one of those Alien rip-offs that proliferated around the few years after 1979 when assembling a crew in a grimy spacecraft and killing them off seemed like the surefire way of getting an audience in: see also countless slasher movies around then as well, only without the spaceships. So the spirit of New World productions, or the imitative Italian film industry, hung heavy over Supernova, except for some reason the cast appeared to be acting under the impression this was something of great quality rather than an unimaginative reheating of some twenty-year-old conventions.

Rather than an alien monster, the villain this time out was a possessed chap called Karl (Peter Facinelli) who they find on the surface of a moon which has just suffered a mining disaster with him the sole survivor. He manages to get aboard, where he finds a crew which in a bid to get this film taken seriously by adults all are suffering some degree of sexual frustration, even those who are having sex with one of the other crewmembers. Rather than rendering this with a more mature slant, it appeared to be more trying to engage with the audience by coaxing Robin Tunney from her clothes at regular intervals, along with selected male cast members showing their arses so the ladies and homosexual gentlemen did not feel left out. If you could tear your attention away from such cynical ploys, there were some nice (if very blue-coloured) special effects to enjoy, with hyperspace jumps and the star trembling on the brink of the title occurence. Overall, it was either too stupid for its ambitions or not stupid enough for the trashier end of the market. Music by David Williams.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1350 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Walter Hill  (1942 - )

American director, writer and producer who specialises in action and Westerns. Entered the industry in 1967 as an assistant director on The Thomas Crown Affair, and in 1972 adapted Jim Thompson's novel The Getaway for Sam Peckinpah. Hill made his directing debut in 1975 with the Charles Bronson actioner Hard Times, but it was The Driver that introduced his hard, stylish approach to the genre. The Warriors has become a campy cult favourite, while The Long Riders was his first foray into Westerns, with Geronimo, Wild Bill and the recent TV show Deadwood following in later years.

During the eighties and nineties, Hill directed a number of mainstream hits, including 48 Hours and its sequel, comedy Brewsters Millions and Schwarzenegger vehicle Red Heat, as well as smaller, more interesting pictures like Southern Comfort, Streets of Fire and Trespass. Hill was also producer on Alien and its three sequels, contributing to the story of the middle two parts.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: