HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Western Stars
League of Gentlemen, The
Higher Power
Shinsengumi
IT Chapter Two
Rich Kids
Arena
Glory Guys, The
Serial Killer's Guide to Life, A
Lovers and Other Strangers
Shiny Shrimps, The
Good Woman is Hard to Find, A
Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Doctor at Sea
Spear
Death Cheaters
Wild Rose
Streetwalkin'
Mystify: Michael Hutchence
Devil's Playground, The
Cleanin' Up the Town: Remembering Ghostbusters
Hustlers
Mega Time Squad
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker
Souvenir, The
Birds of Passage
Ma
Woman at War
Happy as Lazzaro
Mickey's Christmas Carol
Marriage Story
Santa Claus is a Bastard
Star, The
Tom & Jerry: A Nutcracker Tale
Shadow
Christmas Carol, A
Legend of the Demon Cat
Adventures of Sinbad, The
Wounds
Love & Peace
   
 
Newest Articles
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
   
 
  Legacy, The Inherit The EvilBuy this film here.
Year: 1978
Director: Richard Marquand
Stars: Katharine Ross, Sam Elliott, Roger Daltrey, John Standing, Ian Hogg, Margaret Tyzack, Charles Gray, Lee Montague, Hildegard Neil, Marianne Broome, William Abney, Patsy Smart, Mathias Kilroy, Reg Harding
Genre: Horror
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Maggie (Katharine Ross) is a designer who has been invited over to Britain by a mysterious organisation who will be offering her a huge amount of money for her services. The fact that they are so secretive raises the suspicions of her boyfriend Pete (Sam Elliott) and he warns her against getting too mixed up with them, but the allure of a holiday in an Autumnal England proves too much to resist, and soon they are both there, seeing the sights of London. It's when they venture further to the countryside, riding around the narrow lanes on their motorbike, that the unexpected occurs...

OK, maybe not that unexpected considering you've settled down to watch a horror movie, but The Legacy was very much in the thrall of two previous works that had been worldwide successes, one thriller and the other chiller. The main literary influence came from Agatha Christie, as this took the form of those films adapted as And Then There Were None, where a group of various suspects and victims assemble at the requisite mansion and see themselves whittled down one by one by an unknown murderer until the big reveal at the finale.

No such big reveal was necessary here, however, as we pretty much knew what was behind the deaths as Maggie and Pete are run off the road by billionaire John Standing's Roller, whereupon he invites them back to his place - said mansion - to find they're part of an assembly of guests there. Thing is, they're the odd ones out, or so they think, as the others are all rich and successful, some of the most powerful individuals in the world apparently, so what could Maggie and Pete possibly be doing there? You have to ask as their presence is no coincidence, as we discover over the course of the rest of it.

Which brought us to that other chief influence, which was The Omen. Yes, there were demonic practices afoot as the guests were bumped off one by one in gruesome ways, with the first a woman drowned in the swimming pool when she takes a dip thanks to the surface turning impenetrable and trapping her beneath the water. Scenes like this helped to sell the concept, credited to seasoned horror screenwriter Jimmy Sangster, except oddly they did not do much for the movie as every time the advert appeared on the television, potential punters did not go out and see it but did go out and buy John Coyne's novelisation instead. This meant Coyne became an established writer (The Exorcist-inspired The Piercing had been his initial novel), but the film was forgotten.

Back at the plot, Standing disappeared for much of it, as he is bedridden in spite of looking in the rudest of health when Maggie and Pete talked with him, and when she goes to see him at the bedside he grabs her hand and forces a ring onto her finger. On awakening (she passed out in fright), she finds she cannot remove the jewelry, an indication - hey, an "omen" if you like - that she has undertaken some kind of pact with supernatural forces. Various bits of business involving Maggie being a reincarnation, and the down to earth Pete doing his best to leave the mansion but unable to, proceed to offer us the sort of thrills you would expect, although whether they actually thrilled you was up for discussion with only the innovation of the deaths giving a reason to watch. It's not often you get to see Roger Daltrey suffering a failed tracheotomy, so there's that, but most of this was unremarkable if fairly diverting pulp. Music by Michael J. Lewis.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1549 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: