HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Arctic
Fate of Lee Khan, The
El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie
Ladyworld
Rocketman
Kid Who Would Be King, The
Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound
America America
Darkest Minds, The
Along Came Jones
Hummingbird Project, The
Under the Table You Must Go
Harry Birrell Presents Films of Love and War
Hanging Tree, The
Godzilla: King of the Monsters
Scooby-Doo! Camp Scare
Itsy Bitsy
Witchmaker, The
Prey, The
If It's Tuesday, This Must Be Belgium
Happy Death Day 2U
Full Moon High
Strange But True
Kamikaze 1989
Never Grow Old
Time of Your Life, The
Mountain Men, The
Epic
Best Before Death
John Wick Chapter 3: Parabellum
Isabelle
Non-Stop New York
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood
Oblomov
Alita: Battle Angel
We the Animals
Ibiza Undead
Wings of Eagles, The
Beats
Body Parts
   
 
Newest Articles
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
Battle of the Skeksis: The Dark Crystal Now and Then
American Madness: Sam Fuller's Shock Corridor and The Naked Kiss on Blu-ray
Flight of the Navigator and the 80s Futurekids
Trains and Training: The British Transport Films Collection Volume 13 on DVD
Holiday from Hell: In Bruges on Blu-ray
The Comedy Stylings of Kurt Russell: Used Cars and Captain Ron
Robot Rocked: The Avengers Cybernauts Trilogy on Blu-ray
Hammer's Bloodthirsty Bad Girls 1970: Lust for a Vampire and Countess Dracula
Hammer to Fall: Kiss Me Deadly on Blu-ray
Home of the Grave: The House That Dripped Blood and Asylum on Blu-ray
Wondrous Women: Supergirl vs Captain Marvel
Things Have Changed: Films You'd Be Insane to Make Now
   
 
  Night My Number Came Up, The The Dream ThemeBuy this film here.
Year: 1955
Director: Leslie Norman
Stars: Michael Redgrave, Sheila Sim, Alexander Knox, Denholm Elliott, Ursula Jeans, Ralph Truman, Michael Hordern, Nigel Stock, Bill Kerr, Alfie Bass, George Rose, Victor Maddern, David Orr, David Yates, Doreen Aris, Richard Davies, Percy Herbert
Genre: Thriller
Rating:  6 (from 1 vote)
Review: An aeroplane has been lost somewhere in the mountains of Japan, or that's what the British Air Force officers posted there believe, but there is a message for the search team from Commander Lindsay (Michael Hordern). He cannot say why, but he thinks they are looking in the wrong place for the survivors, and offers an area they have not been scanning to seek them instead. The reasoning behind this mysterious information is not anything that would be officially recognised, after all, who would believe a dream..?

The Night My Number Came Up was one of those unassuming little British films, one of the dramatic ones from the Ealing Studios, which hinges on such an ingenious item of intrigue that even if you saw it years ago, it'll spring to mind immediately when it's mentioned. "What was that movie where they were on the plane and the prediction it was to crash came true?" might be the kind of question that arises in connection with this, and while the title may not be readily conjured up, the fact that it was based on a true story offered it that degree of credence.

Especially as it was based on a newspaper article from a genuine Air Force officer, an important one too, Sir Victor Goddard - who just happened to be an ardent spritulaist as well, which may go some way to explaining how he happened to come up with the dream in the first place if he was so much interested in such paranormal goings-on. Of course, that simply throws up more questions, and the film was not about to answer them other than to depict what happened and leave you with a little frisson about there being more things in this world dreamt of in our philosophy, you know the sort of thing.

The Goddard stand-in character was Hordern's Lindsay, although it's all right for him as he doesn't go anywhere near the plane he has made the prediction about, simply showing up for a dinner party a few of the other characters who will be travelling on it attend, and putting the wind up them with his nightmare. The puzzle arises that if he had kept it to himself, would that have had any bearing on the outcome? Which the film considers, as the fact the pilot was told and such professionals can be a superstitious bunch (according to this - more superstitious than the Navy?) might have put the thought in his mind that there may well be dire problems up ahead.

Lindsay has claimed that the crash will be fatal, and as the details he mapped out begin to turn out to be true - the make of plane, the eight passengers and five staff onboard (making the conveniently unlucky number thirteen) - one of the passengers, Robertson (Alexander Knox) who is taking his first flight starts to worry. The Air Marshall (Michael Redgrave) is not so convinced, and insists that they should put their faith in the here and now, not some supernatural balderdash, but even he is having doubts when the ice forms on the wings and they get lost in a fierce storm. If there's a problem with this, it's not so much the suspension of disbelief, that part is quite fun, it's that the original article was pretty short and director Leslie Norman had his work cut out for him stretching the suspense over an hour and a half. Fortunately he managed it, so if the plot is undernourished, all hands here stepped up to the challenge admirably. Music (heavy on the spooky noises) by Malcolm Arnold.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 1691 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: