HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Bruce Lee & I
Doraemon The Movie: Nobita's Dinosaur
Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood
Invasion Planet Earth
Ferdinand
Buddhist Spell, The
Steel and Lace
Reivers, The
Angel Has Fallen
I Lost My Body
At First Light
Free Ride
Crawl
Transit
Blank Check
Mad Monk, The
Wind, The
Holly and the Ivy, The
Atlantique
Now, Voyager
Wolf's Call, The
Nostalghia
Nightingale, The
Eighth Grade
Irishman, The
Betrayed
Lords of Chaos
Operation Petticoat
Dead Don't Die, The
On the Waterfront
Last Faust, The
Moonlighting
Art of Self-Defense, The
Ironweed
Booksmart
Prisoners
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
   
 
Newest Articles
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
   
 
  Lunch Hour Alone At LastBuy this film here.
Year: 1961
Director: James Hill
Stars: Shirley Anne Field, Robert Stephens, Kay Walsh, Hazel Hughes, Michael Robbins, Nigel Davenport, Neil Culleton, Sandra Lea, Vi Stevens, Peter Ashmore
Genre: Comedy, Drama, Romance
Rating:  4 (from 1 vote)
Review: This man (Robert Stephens) has hit upon a great idea. There's this girl (Shirley Anne Field) he's been seeing from the office, a textile manufacturers, she's started in the art department while he has a minor executive role, but they have had trouble seeing each other in privacy. So he has arranged for a room in this quiet boarding house for their lunch hour so they can get down to what they really want to do, and she has gone along with it because she believes him when he says he loves her. Which is the truth, but before the hour is up he may have some thinking to do about that...

Lunch Hour was a modest British B-movie scripted by one of its most respected writers, John Mortimer, best known for his television work - Rumpole of the Bailey was his most famous creation, but he also adapted Brideshead Revisited for the small screen, which many regard as a classic of its kind. It's unlikely that anyone would consider this little item in the same way, as he adapted his own play for a work that was not much seen at the time, and not much seen thereafter; this was no lost gem, more a relic of the era for cinematic archaeologists to pore over, marvelling at its quaint views and the manner in which it resolved its drama.

For the first half we see the events that led up to the couple taking the room, how the two of them met at the office, and how every time they tried to fill up that darn lunch hour with a spot of amorous distraction - strictly kissing and cuddling here, mind you - they were continually interrupted. They go to the stock warehouse, the park, a tea room, but everywhere they simply cannot be alone, which begs the question, why not forget about the lunch break and see each other after work? For some bizarre reason this never crosses their minds, which stresses the artificiality of the conceit, as if this was all designed by Mortiimer to thwart whatever passion they ever worked up.

But that's nothing compared to the second half of the film, which is just over an hour long, where Field's English Rose turns into some kind of maniac when she hears the subterfuge that her would-be boyfriend has invented to ensure that they could have use of the room from the manageress (Kay Walsh). It's not enough that this busybody should be fobbed off with a long and involved explanation (ie. lie), but she has to keep on interrupting them too with cups of tea and worrying over the fire, and once they think they've gotten rid of her the girl (the couple are never named) asks about the big fib. As if that were not bad enough for the man, she acts as if the whole story about her travelling down from the North with their kids and leaving said kids with the battleaxe aunty (Hazel Hughes) was real - we see her visions of how awful this will be - and she throws a tantrum, hectoring the poor chap about the domestic hell he puts her through. Not only is this hard to believe, it's annoying as well, so much so that it's a relief when it's over.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2969 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: