HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Sorry to Bother You
Last Days, The
Man Who Killed Hitler and Then The Bigfoot, The
Being Frank: The Chris Sievey Story
Once Upon a Time in London
King Lear
Under the Silver Lake
Satan's Mistress
Border
Lemonade Joe
Earth Maiden Arjuna
Sons of Katie Elder, The
Soldier, The
Mr. Topaze
Aquaman
One, Two, Three
Bad Times at the El Royale
Caretaker, The
Old Man and the Gun, The
Song of Bernadette, The
Creed II
Anna and the Apocalypse
Return of the Hero
White Reindeer, The
Lizzie
Wicked, Wicked
Faces Places
Strange Woman, The
Ralph Breaks the Internet
Sky Bandits
Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse
Devil's Sword, The
Leprechaun Returns
Man in the Wilderness
Mug
Love Me Deadly
Look Away
J.C.
Filmworker
Sixty Glorious Years
   
 
Newest Articles
For Christ's Sake: Jesus Christ Superstar and The Last Temptation of Christ
Not In Front of the Children: Inappropriate Kids Movies
Deeper into Ozploitation: Next of Kin and Fair Game
Between the Wars: Babylon Berlin Series 1&2 on DVD
Hard Luck Story: Detour on Blu-ray
Oh, What Happened to You? The Likely Lads on Blu-ray
Killer Apps: The Rise of the Evil 60s Supercomputers
How 1970s Can You Get? Cliff Richard in Take Me High vs Never Too Young to Rock
A Perfect Engine, An Eating Machine: The Jaws Series
Phwoar, Missus! Sexytime for Hollywood
He-Maniacs: Ridiculous 80s Action
All's Welles That Ends Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 1 on DVD
Shut It! The Sweeney Double Bill: Two Blu-rays from Network
Network Sitcom Movie Double Bill: Till Death Us Do Part and Man About the House on Blu-ray
No, THIS Must Be the Place: True Stories on Blu-ray
   
 
  White Fang Fulci loves cuddly animals but he's not so fond of peopleBuy this film here.
Year: 1973
Director: Lucio Fulci
Stars: Franco Nero, Virna Lisi, Fernando Rey, John Steiner, Missaele, Daniel Martin, Raimund Harmstorf, Daniele Dublino, Carole André, Rik Battaglia, John Bartha, Luigi Antonio Guerra, Carla Mancini, Maurice Poli
Genre: Western, Adventure
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Jack London’s classic novel is given the spaghetti western treatment here. Amidst the snowy wastes of the Klondike, Native American Charlie (Daniel Martin) and his young son Mitsah (Missaele) encounter the aging Buck, canine hero of London’s other classic The Call of the Wild, and his half-wolf offspring White Fang. Although Charlie warns him to stay away from the feral hound, Mitsah befriends White Fang who repays his kindness by saving him from drowning in the icy river. Meanwhile, Charlie’s close friends, two-fisted journalist Jason Scott (spaghetti western icon Franco Nero) and tough guy architect Kurt Jansen (Raimund Harmstorf) aim to clean up the nearby prospecting town and quickly find themselves at loggerheads with local villain Charles “Beauty” Smith (John Steiner). Beauty seemingly controls the bank and the mounted police and is conning the miners out of their rightful earnings. When Charlie arrives, hoping to find his son a doctor, he is knifed by one of Beauty’s thugs, thus spurring Jason, Kurt and White Fang into action.

Lucio Fulci directed a heart-warming family movie about a cuddly canine?! Well yes actually, Fulci dabbled in an array of genres before Zombie Flesh Eaters (1979) typecast him as Italy’s godfather of gore. In fact, White Fang marks an unlikely union of two exploitation titans given it was scripted by none other than Harry Alan Towers, under his usual pseudonym of Peter Welbeck. Unlike the 1991 Disney adaptation starring a young Ethan Hawke, Fulci and Towers downplay the doggy derring-do against the human drama, although White Fang does play a major part in how the story develops and heroically battles the bad guys during the exciting finale. Woven into the central conflict between heroic Franco Nero and evil John Steiner (who does effete villainy better than any other Euro-western star) are Virna Lisi as a nun who founds the new hospital in town; Fernando Rey as a disreputable, alcoholic priest who turns a blind eye to Beauty’s evildoing; and the enchanting Carole André who plays a saloon girl with a tragic secret.

Although well-acted and intelligently scripted with a winning anti-racist subtext, the film is unusually structured around these floating subplots that don’t really come together until the final third and give ostensible lead Franco Nero surprisingly little to do. Reunited with Fulci following their underrated spaghetti western Massacre Time (1966), the pair did not exactly welcome each other with open arms and at one point, the notoriously short-tempered director is alleged to have beaten Nero up. Fulci supposedly held his non-human actors in far greater esteem, but considering this is meant to be a family movie he dwells somewhat excessively on some gory dog fights. Of course that is somewhat true to form and later resurfaced when he directed what some claim was the last, great spaghetti western, Silver Saddle (1978), where star/co-producer Guliano Genma wanted a kinder, gentler fun for the family kind of movie, but Fulci wanted to up the violence quota.

The straightforward story doesn’t give Fulci much room to indulge his usual flourishes, but he tells it well and includes some quite affecting dramatic scenes. Some sources claim this was Fulci’s most financially successful movie which may come as a shock to the gorehounds but seems plausible since it spawned a sequel: The Return of White Fang (1974).

Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 2656 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Lucio Fulci  (1927 - 1996)

Italian director whose long career could best be described as patchy, but who was also capable of turning in striking work in the variety of genres he worked in, most notably horror. After working for several years as a screenwriter, he made his debut in 1959 with the comedy The Thieves. Various westerns, musicals and comedies followed, before Fulci courted controversy in his homeland with Beatrice Cenci, a searing attack on the Catholic church.

The 70s and early 80s were marked by slick, hard-hitting thrillers like A Lizard in a Woman's Skin, Don't Torture a Duckling and The Smuggler, while Fulci scored his biggest international success in 1979 with the gruesome Zombie Flesh Eaters. Manhattan Baby, City of the Living Dead, The Beyond and The House by the Cemetery were atmospheric, bloody slices of Gothic horror, and The New York Ripper set a new standard in misogynistic violence. Fulci's last notable film was the truly unique A Cat in the Brain in 1990, a semi-autobiographical, relentlessly gory comedy in which he also starred. Died in 1996 from a diabetic fit after several years of ill-health.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Shrimpton
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Enoch Sneed
George White
Stately Wayne Manor
Paul Smith
   

 

Last Updated: