HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Night Eats the World, The
War Bus
Back to Berlin
Leave No Trace
They Shall Not Grow Old
Dollman
Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
Man Who Invented Christmas, The
Tom's Midnight Garden
Lady, Stay Dead
Thieves, The
My Dear Secretary
I Think We're Alone Now
Amazing Colossal Man, The
Welcome Home, Roxy Carmichael
Suzanne
Nae Pasaran!
Kiss of the Dragon
Other Side of the Wind, The
Secret Santa
Wolcott
10.000 Km
Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure
Hitler's Hollywood
Ghost Goes Gear, The
First Purge, The
House of Wax
Mandy
Climax, The
Justice League Dark
   
 
Newest Articles
Bout for the Count: Hammer's Dracula in the 1970s
Nopes from a Small Island: Mistreatment of American Stars in British Films
You Know, For Kids: Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box
If He Were a Carpenter and It Was the 80s: The Fog, Prince of Darkness and They Live
Tee-Hee, It's 80s Sci-Fi Horror: Night of the Comet, The Stuff and Night of the Creeps
Chance of a Ghost: The Uninvited and The Ghost and Mrs. Muir
3 Simian Slashers: Phenomena, Link and Monkey Shines
When is a Jackie Chan Movie Not a Jackie Chan Movie? Armour of God and City Hunter
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 2
Anytime Anywhere: The Complete Goodies at the BBC Episode Guide Part 1
I-Spy Scotland: The Thirty Nine Steps and Eye of the Needle
Manor On Movies--Black Shampoo--three three three films in one
Manor On Movies--Invasion USA
Time Trap: Last Year in Marienbad and La Jetée
Gaining Three Stone: Salvador, Natural Born Killers and Savages
   
 
  Alias Jesse James He sold the riskiest insurance policy in the westBuy this film here.
Year: 1959
Director: Norman Z. Macleod
Stars: Bob Hope, Rhonda Fleming, Wendell Corey, Gloria Talbott, Jim Davis, Will Wright, Mary Young, Mickey Finn, Bob Gunderson, Fred Kohler Jr., Ethan Laidlaw, Glenn Strange
Genre: Western, Comedy
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: With several comedy westerns under his loose-fitting gun-belt comic legend Bob Hope was a dab hand at spoofing the wild frontier. Produced by his own company, Hope Enterprises, Alias Jesse James was his last such outing and opens with a jokey dedication to that most unsung hero of the American West: the insurance salesman. Where would the economy be without him? Milford Farnsworth (Bob Hope) is the most incompetent salesman at Plymouth Rock Insurance. His luck looks set to change when he lands a new client whom he fails to recognise as notorious outlaw Jesse James (Wendell Corey). Flush with cash from his latest robbery, Jesse takes out a policy for the sum of $100,000 bequeathing everything to his girlfriend Cora Lee Collins (Rhonda Fleming).

Realising Milford’s mistake, head honcho Mr. Queasy (Will Wright) sends him to Missouri to convince Jesse to relinquish his policy or else keep him safe from harm. A series of madcap misadventures bring Milford into the James gang where he winds up falling in love with beautiful Cora. Upon learning of Jesse’s insurance policy, Cora suspects something is up. Sure enough, the outlaw plans to have Milford pose as him and take a bullet, after which Jesse can marry Cora and collect his own insurance money. But Milford proves far luckier than anyone suspected.

By this stage in his career, Bob Hope was less a studio actor than his own cottage industry. The man who once, as Woody Allen described delivered lethal one-liners as if they were lighter than air, now cranked out cosy comedy vehicles for an audience long-accustomed to his patter, whether on stage, on film or more increasingly on television. While his 1960s output took a turn for the formulaic, here on the cusp of a new decade he delivers a wholly amiable affair. Alias Jesse James saw him reunited with Norman Z. Macleod, one of Hollywood’s most formidable comedy directors who had an array of Marx Brothers (Monkey Business (1931), Horse Feathers (1932)) and Hope vehicles (Road to Rio (1947), Casanova’s Big Night (1954)) to his credit, alongside oddball gems like Topper (1937) and Alice in Wonderland (1933). Most crucially he directed Hope’s first comedy western hit: The Paleface (1948), so was undoubtedly a sure hand.

The film lacks the consistent energy of earlier Hope classics but enough gags hit their mark to make it a wild west hoot. Many have a decidedly cartoon flavour akin to the cowboy themed animated shorts of Tex Avery or Friz Freleng: e.g. when a shell-shocked Hope walks straight through a glass window, gets a dose of strong liquor that makes his hat explode, or - in the fantastically frenetic finale - leads a breakneck chase with legs flailing through a wagon and his ass rubbed raw across a log. One or two jokes do fall a little flat, notably Milford meeting the young Harry Truman, allowing staunch Republican Hope his dig at the Democrat former president (who’d been out of office for some time, so what was the point?). Still, there is an agreeable amount of inspired lunacy that ranges from the relentlessly cheerful Ma James (Mary Young) who insists her sons eat a full breakfast before they kill a man, to when Hope doses outlaws with magic mushrooms (!) which leads to the world’s slowest punch-up.

Hope can still fire those one-liners as good as any gunslinger and sings a peppy duet with ravishing Rhonda Fleming, whose flame-red hair was made for Technicolor. This was her second pairing opposite Hope after The Great Lover (1949) but she also brings a wealth of experience from her many western roles including Gunfight at the O.K. Corral (1957), Pony Express (1953) and Bullwhip (1958), a wild west reworking of Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew. Typically for a Hope comedy, the female characters are far feistier than the timid leading man and this extends to Princess Irawanie (Gloria Talbott - star of the wonderful I Married A Monster From Outer Space (1958) one of the best Fifties sci-fi films), a lovely Indian princess who takes a shine to Milford and gets him out of a few scrapes. Winningly however, Milford is not a total milksop and actually proves quite resourceful on several occasions, notably with a nifty trick he rigs to outdraw a rival gunslinger.

Of course facing down the whole James gang is still beyond his abilities which leads to the justly celebrated shootout where a whole host of western icons emerge to lend a hand: Gary Cooper (“Yup!”), Ward Bond from Wagon Train, Hugh O’Brian from The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp, James Arness star of the long-running Gunsmoke, Fess Parker from Disney’s Davy Crockett, Gail Davis as Annie Oakley, Jay Silverheels who played Tonto on The Lone Ranger, and everyone’s favourite yodelling cowboy Roy Rogers who earlier co-starred with Hope in the magnificent Son of Paleface (1952). Curiously, a scene shot with the great Gene Autry was dropped from this sequence and though several sourcebooks list James Garner among the guest stars, but the star does not appear. However, the sequence is capped by a marvellous cameo from Hope’s regular sparring partner Bing Crosby, who dryly remarks: “This fella needs all the help he can get!”
Reviewer: Andrew Pragasam

 

This review has been viewed 4114 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Who's the best?
Steven Seagal
Pam Grier
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
George White
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
Rashed Ali
Alexander Taylor
   

 

Last Updated: