HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Invisible Man, The
Honey Boy
System Crasher
Judy & Punch
Bacurau
Battling Butler
Vivarium
Seven Chances
Dogs Don't Wear Pants
Navigator, The
Knives Out
Hit!
Charlie's Angels
Passport to Shame
Le Mans '66
Keep Fit
Doctor Sleep
Friend or Foe
Brass Target
Mine and the Minotaur, The
Sky Pirates
Syncopation
Sea Children, The
Ghost of a Chance, A
Go Kart Go
Great Buster, The
Seventy Deadly Pills
Wings of Mystery
Treasure at the Mill
VFW
Crime Wave
Terminator: Dark Fate
Slithis
Antonio Gaudi
Oscar, The
Color Out of Space
Last Holiday
Zombieland: Double Tap
Mind Benders, The
Mighty Wind, A
   
 
Newest Articles
Put the Boot In: Villain on Blu-ray
The Children's Film Foundation Bumper Box Vol. 2: Vic Pratt Interview
All the Lonely People: Sunday Bloody Sunday on Blu-ray
Desperate Characters: Beat the Devil on Blu-ray
Chansons d'Amour: Alfie Darling on Blu-ray
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
Godzilla Goes to Hollywood
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
   
 
  aloha bobby and rose Love On The Run
Year: 1975
Director: Floyd Mutrux
Stars: Paul Le Mat, Dianne Hull, Tim McIntire, Leigh French, Martine Bartlett, Noble Willingham, Robert Carradine, Eric Hines, Mario Giallo, Tony Gardenas, Edward James Olmos, Clifton Tip Fredell, William Dooley, Cliff Emmich, David Bond, Dorothy Love
Genre: Drama, RomanceBuy from Amazon
Rating:  7 (from 1 vote)
Review: Bobby (Paul Le Mat) is a mechanic working in a garage who decides to supplement his meagre income with a spot of betting on a pool game, but true to form he loses, and his opponent is none too impressed when told that Bobby doesn't have the money to pay hm. After his offer of his car is turned down, he gets twenty four hours to supply the winnings, and perhaps at that moment he was convinced he would manage to secure them, but as the next day dawns Bobby has difficulty finding anyone willing to offer him the seventy-five dollars he needs. And then, as he schemes, he meets Rose (Dianne Hull)...

As writer and director, Floyd Mutrux saw his best films made in the seventies, with his most appreciated effort, American Hot Wax, the perfect example of his naturalistic style applied to a figure from recent history. Another aspect that marked out his movies was the way he scattered an abundance of rock and pop records on their soundtracks, a device which although had been popularised by George Lucas in American Graffiti, did not feel second hand when heard in the Mutrux works. Here not five minutes go by without a burst of recognisable music, and most of it is Elton John: here is Tiny Dancer decades before Almost Famous gave it a renewed vigour.

Mutrux used that music to capture a place and time, and this film definitely feels as if it has vividly conjured up the sense of being in Los Angeles and its surroundings in the mid-seventies, especially when much of what the characters do is hang out with each other with a curious lack of urgency in spite of the trouble Bobby and Rose have found themselves in. Bobby is one of those guys who doesn't go looking for trouble, only it has no bother easily finding him, and you can tell he is headed for a precipitous fall from the first scene. The main question that therefore arises before long is whether he will bring Rose down with him.

Rose is a young single mother who meets the mechanic when he delivers her car to her workplace, another working class character struggling to get by, a match for Bobby. With his naive charm, he wins her over, but the night he is supposed to be heading back to the pool hall to repay his debts (and saving friend Robert Carradine, let's not forget) he is spending it with Rose and when they go into a grocery store, he starts pretending to the assistant that he is robbing it. Yes, he really is that stupid, so when this prank ends with one man dead and another unconscious, the couple have to go on the run in a Bonnie and Clyde fashion typical of this decade's entertainments, but they don't get quite as far as they should have.

Common sense tells you that Bobby and Rose should have stayed at the scene and explained the mistake, but then, with Bobby's luck and propensity for putting his foot in it, you cannot guarantee that the law would believe him. You get the impression that he half enjoys the idea of living life on the road, but Rose suffers more because she has left her son behind, and that is the reason they eventually return to meet whatever fate has in store for them. Along the way they encounter loudmouth Tim McIntire, who Mutrux indulges in a seemingly improvised performance, but he provides the note of hope that is always just out of Bobby's grasp. This is one of those films which may not be widely heard of, but for some reason sticks in the memory of those who catch it, perhaps because of the striking soundtrack and tearjerking ending. It's not brilliant filmmaking, but it's good enough to be hard to forget.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 3668 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: