HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Wind, The
Holly and the Ivy, The
Atlantique
Now, Voyager
Wolf's Call, The
Nostalghia
Nightingale, The
Eighth Grade
Irishman, The
Betrayed
Lords of Chaos
Operation Petticoat
Dead Don't Die, The
On the Waterfront
Last Faust, The
Moonlighting
Art of Self-Defense, The
Ironweed
Booksmart
Prisoners
Beach Bum, The
Kill Ben Lyk
Into the Mirror
Support the Girls
Werewolf
Little Monsters
Spider-Man: Far from Home
Horrible Histories: The Movie - Rotten Romans
Pentathlon
Anna
Moulin Rouge
Ray & Liz
African Queen, The
Helen Morgan Story, The
Golem, Der
Yentl
Finishing Line, The
Triple Threat
Mysterious Castle in the Carpathians, The
Driven
   
 
Newest Articles
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
Growing Up in Public: 7-63 Up on Blu-ray
Learn Your Craft: Legend of the Witches and Secret Rites on Blu-ray
70s Psycho-Thrillers! And Soon the Darkness and Fright on Blu-ray
Split: Stephen King and George A. Romero's The Dark Half on Blu-ray
Disney Post-Walt: Three Gamechangers
But Doctor, I Am Pagliacci: Tony Hancock's The Rebel and The Punch and Judy Man on Blu-ray
Once Upon a Time in Deadwood: Interview with Director Rene Perez
Shit-Eating Grim: Salo, or the 120 Days of Sodom on Blu-ray
Stallone's 80s Action Alpha and Omega: Nighthawks and Lock Up
Python Prehistory: At Last the 1948 Show and Do Not Adjust Your Set on DVD
You Could Grow to Love This Place: Local Hero on Blu-ray
Anglo-American: Joseph Losey Blu-ray Double Bill - The Criminal and The Go-Between
Marvel's Least Loved and Most Loved: Fantastic 4 vs Avengers: Endgame
   
 
  Tony Rome My, My MiamiBuy this film here.
Year: 1967
Director: Gordon Douglas
Stars: Frank Sinatra, Jill St. John, Richard Conte, Gena Rowlands, Simon Oakland, Sue Lyon, Jeffrey Lynn, Lloyd Bochner, Robert J. Wilke, Virginia Vincent, Joan Shawlee, Richard Krisher, Lloyd Gough, Babe Hart, Elisabeth Fraser, Rocky Graziano, Shecky Greene
Genre: Thriller
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: Tony Rome (Frank Sinatra) used to be a cop until he got disillusioned with the force, and now makes his living as a private detective, but even that is barely covering his gambling debts. Today he wakes up on the boat he lives on in a Miami port and gets a message from his old partner: he wants Tony to help with some trouble at the hotel he works at as a detective. Tony is reluctant at first, but then hears there's money in it for him and heads over to find an unconscious young woman, Diana (Sue Lyon), in one of the rooms. She is the daughter of construction millionaire Rudy Kosterberg (Simon Oakland), and by agreeing to drive her home, Tony is about to get into a whole mess of trouble...

This film begins with Nancy Sinatra singing a Lee Hazlewood number dedicated to the crimefighter of the title, an opening sequence which ends on a crash zoom into a young woman's behind. Funnily enough, it ends with a crash zoom onto a young woman's behind as well, but if in between you're expecting scene after scene of wacky swinging sixties craziness, then you quickly discover that this introduction is not representative. Tony Rome was more of a tribute to those Raymond Chandler and Dashiell Hammett private eye mysteries of the thirties and forties, and as such Sinatra gets to act wary in the face of a selection of shady characters.

During this decade, if you were a male star and didn't much fancy replicating the antics of James Bond in your big screen excursions, the next best thing was to become a detective. Sinatra could not have got away with the louche stylings of his friend Dean Martin in those Matt Helm movies, and he was no James Coburn therefore a Derek Flint imitation was out, so instead he tried his hand at detective work, and this was a big enough hit that a sequel, Lady in Cement, was rushed out the next year. In truth, if you compare this to the classic private eye movies it wants to be mentioned in the same breath as, Tony Rome only goes so far before looking like a fair copy: not terrible, but you can see where its inspirations lie.

Tony gets to visit a big mansion when he takes Diana home, meeting her extended family who have been worrying about her, an extended family in that there have been a few breakups and exes floating about, including one woman who catches his notice, Ann Archer (Jill St. John) when Diana calls her a "slut" and amused, she asks him to take her home. Not before Tony has made an impression and is soon being contacted by family members to sort things out for them, something which bemuses him but he isn't about to turn down cash: unless it goes against his ethics, that is. Tony comes across as the sole person to trust amidst these schemers, and we latch onto him with a faith that he will explain all by the end.

In the meantime, in true Philip Marlowe fashion he gets beaten up, but also hands out his fair share of beatings, as you can't envisage Sinatra wanting to lose in a fight onscreen in these circumstances, and meets various members of the low and high lives, offering bits of comedic business (as when he anticipates Are You Being Served? with an American Mrs Slocombe and talk of her "pussy"). The role seems tailor made for the star, as it probably was, he carries it off with cynical aplomb, but after a while the list of lurid characters begins to weary the viewer and one hankers for a solution. As with its predecessors, the explanations here may well drift from the mind a few minutes after you've watched it, but at least you can see it again without worrying you'll guess the ending, mostly because you'll have forgotten it. We do find out how to drink a lot without getting drunk: do as Tony does and never drain your glass. Music by Billy May.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2277 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
Darren Jones
Paul Smith
  Rachel Franke
Paul Shrimpton
  Desbris M
   

 

Last Updated: