HOME |  JOIN |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Walk with Me
JFK
Kirlian Witness, The
Kid for Two Farthings, A
The Freshman
Hear My Song
Wild Wild West
Cure
Doraemon: Nobita and the Green Giant Legend
Locke the Superman
Psycho
Magic Flute, The
Top Secret
Ghost Punting
Hitman's Bodyguard, The
Touch, The
Akko's Secret
Backfire
Loving Vincent
Adventures of the Wilderness Family, The
Plot of Fear
Desperate Chase, The
Baskin
Time and Tide
X - Night of Vengeance
Bunny Drop
Acts of Vengeance
Asura: The City of Madness
In This Corner of the World
Dirty Pair: Project Eden
   
 
Newest Articles
The Cinematic Darkside of Donald Crowhurst
Dutch Courage: The Flodder Series
Coming of Age: Boys on Film 18 - Heroes on DVD
Country and Irish - The secret history of Irish pop culture
Wash All This Scum Off the Streets: Vigilante Movies
Force the Issue: Star Wars' Tricky Middle Prequels and Sequels
Rediscovered: The Avengers - Tunnel of Fear on DVD
Sword Play: An Actor's Revenge vs Your Average Zatoichi Movie
Super Sleuths: The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes on DVD
Stop That, It's Silly: The Ends of Monty Python
They're All Messed Up: Night of the Living Dead vs Land of the Dead
The House, Black Magic and an Oily Maniac: 3 from 70s Weird Asia
80s Meet Cute: Something Wild vs Into the Night
Interview with The Unseen Director Gary Sinyor
Wrong Forgotten: Is Troll 2 Still a Thing?
   
 
  Quest, The Fight NightBuy this film here.
Year: 1996
Director: Jean-Claude Van Damme
Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme, Roger Moore, James Remar, Janet Gunn, Jack McGee, Aki Aleong, Abdel Qissi, Louis Mandylor, Chang Ching Peng Chaplin, Ryan Cutrona, Shane Meier, Matt Lyon, Jen Sung Outerbridge, Peter Wong, Kitao Koji, Habby Heske, César Carneiro
Genre: Action, Adventure
Rating:  7 (from 2 votes)
Review: In New York City, an elderly man walks into a bar, the only customer, and orders a coffee. The barman asks him if he'd like a spot of whiskey in it and he goes along with that, sitting down to wait to be served, but before he can settle three young punks walk in and start hassling the bartender. The old man warns them not to cause any trouble, then proves he means it by beating two of them up and scaring off the third. The barman gratefully asks him where he learned to fight like that which prompts the man to tell him a tale of 1925, when Christopher Dubois (Jean-Claude Van Damme) was young...

Wait a minute, this film was released in 1996 and Monsieur Van Damme is recalling the time seventy years ago when he looks about thirty, which would make him over one hundred years old in the wraparound sequences. It's a miracle Dubois is still alive, not least because of the amount of punishment his body takes in the bulk of the story. The Quest was his directorial debut and he made it count with a film that was essentially a retelling of Bloodsport only with a bigger budget and a period setting, the first half being an adventure yarn.

And the second half being about forty minutes of people pretending to beat each other up. In the early stages of that first half we realise that what Van Damme really wanted to be was Father Christmas as Dubois works the streets as a clown to provide for his gang of urchins - we'll give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he didn't want to be the next Fagin. Anyway, he has to run for it from both gangsters and the police (talk about unlucky) but promises to return with enough cash to take care of the kids. He ends up unwittingly stowing away on a ship to the Far East, where he meets one Lord Dobbs, played by Roger Moore in what he claimed was his least favourite role (does that include Boat Trip? Good grief).

Dobbs is a rogue and a pirate posing as an English gentleman (what else would he be with Sir Roger in the part?), and he abandons Dubois on an island where he is taught the ways of fighting in much the same way of a million martial arts movies before and since, so when Dobbs meets him again he has a proposition for him: take him to the tournament in Tibet and help him win the very expensive solid gold dragon that is up for grabs. This is all an extensive lead up to the head kicking and gut punching, so once the characters reach Tibet, joined by journalist Carrie Newton (Janet Gunn) and champion boxer Maxie Devine (James Remar) it all gets very repetitive.

What happens in this tournament is that representatives from a variety of countries lay into one another to see who is the best, although for some reason left unexplained Jean-Claude does not represent Belgium, but the United States. Maybe he's standing in for both as he still has the accent. Among the others are a Korean, a German, a Sumo wrestler from Japan, and various other stereotypical-looking stuntmen, so the Spaniard is dressed up as a flamenco dancer and there is a kilt-wearing Scotsman in there, but it pains me to say that he is rubbish, getting in a few jabs before having his bollocks crunched. Funnily enough nobody else thinks to use this move, as the climactic combat could have been much curtailed if they had. There are no surprises as to who wins, which makes this either enjoyably satisfying or achingly predictable depending on your point of view. Music by Randy Edelman.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2010 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which film has the best theme song?
Spectre
The Ups and Downs of a Handyman
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
George White
Darren Jones
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
Enoch Sneed
  Mark Scampion
  Frank Michaels
   

 

Last Updated: