HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
First Man
Machete Maidens Unleashed!
Cannibal Club, The
Grasshopper, The
Searching
Human Desire
Climax
Stiff Upper Lips
American Animals
Outlaws
Venom
World on a Wire
Velvet Buzzsaw
Picnic
Dick Dickman, PI
Hunter Killer
30 Foot Bride of Candy Rock, The
Race for the Yankee Zephyr
Boys in the Band, The
Brainscan
T-Men
Blame
Upgrade
Evening with Beverly Luff Linn, An
Fear No Evil
One Cut of the Dead
Rosa Luxemburg
Disobedience
On the Job
Monsters and Men
   
 
Newest Articles
He-Maniacs: Ridiculous 80s Action
All's Welles That Ends Welles: Orson Welles Great Mysteries Volume 1 on DVD
Shut It! The Sweeney Double Bill: Two Blu-rays from Network
Network Sitcom Movie Double Bill: Till Death Us Do Part and Man About the House on Blu-ray
No, THIS Must Be the Place: True Stories on Blu-ray
Alf Garnett's Life After Death: Till Death... and The Thoughts of Chairman Alf on DVD
Balance of Power: Harold Pinter at the BBC on DVD
Strange Days 2: The Second Science Fiction Weirdness Wave
Strange Days: When Science Fiction Went Weird
Ha Ha Haaargh: Interview With Camp Death III in 2D! Director Matt Frame
Phone Freak: When a Stranger Calls on Blu-ray
A Name to Conjure With: David Nixon's Magic Box on DVD
Which 1950s Sci-Fi was Scariest? Invaders from Mars vs The Blob
The Empire Strikes Back: Khartoum vs Carry On Up the Khyber
Stan and Ollie's Final Folly: Atoll K on Blu-ray
   
 
  Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian, The Not Nearly The Last BattleBuy this film here.
Year: 2008
Director: Andrew Adamson
Stars: Ben Barnes, Georgie Henley, Skandar Keynes, William Moseley, Anna Popplewell, Sergio Castelitto, Peter Dinklage, Warwick Davis, Vincent Grass, Pierfrancesco Favino, Cornell John, Damián Alcázar, Ken Stott, Eddie Izzard, Liam Neeson, Tilda Swinton
Genre: Action, Fantasy, Adventure
Rating:  6 (from 2 votes)
Review: Prince Caspian (Ben Barnes) is in trouble. His aunt has just given birth to a son tonight, meaning his claim to the throne is weaker than the infant's - so unsteady, in fact, that he is forced to flee his bedchamber in the middle of the night when roused by his tutor Cornelius (Vincent Grass), thereby escaping the soldiers who burst in a few short seconds later and fire crossbow bolts into the bed, thinking they are killing him. But he has got away, and rushes from the castle on horseback with the King's men in hot pursuit; reaching a clearing in the forest, he encounters two fierce dwarves, then makes the only choice available: he blows his horn.

The reason he does that is to summon the four monarchs of Narnia who have long since disappeared from the land, and they happen to be the four kids we saw in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, the first entry in this series of Disney adaptations of C.S. Lewis's famed run of fantasy novels. Disney had come a long way from the likes of The Absent-Minded Professor and The Love Bug in their live action movies, as far as this series went at any rate, and there was a definite sense of the corporation drawing itself up to its full height here and announcing to the world that it was fully capable of making Important Works of Literary Classics.

When Aslan finally appears, he tells little Lucy (Georgie Henley) that "Things never happen the same way twice" but there are a number of similarities between this and the previous film as it has much the same tone, the same sense of worthiness, and the battle scenes that could have come from The Lord of the Rings trilogy, a comparison you imagine that the filmmakers are only too happy to court. Certainly there are almost equal levels of walking about as there are in the Tolkein epics, but somehow director Andrew Adamson manages to miss the same daunting scale, perhaps because of his insistence on beefing up the original stories with action.

However, while The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe was a rather stuffy affair for all its visual splendour, it seems as though everyone has a better idea of how to handle the material this time around, and it does not feel as long as its predecessor. The shots at leavening the serious nature with humour are variable but thankfully do not betray the source with crudeness: Lucy complaining that everyone is trying to act grown up being met with a muttered response from dwarf Trumpkin (Peter Dinklage on fine form as usual) that he is grown up is the nicest gag.

What the previous film had that this does not is a strong villain, and Tilda Swinton's brief reprise of the White Witch provides a shiver that the less charismatic King Miraz (Sergio Castelitto) does not. One the other hand, the effects are equally as slick, with the battling mice resembling Stuart Little on steroids, and Aslan, as before, remains a marvellous creation. Some of the makeup choices are a little odd, mind you, with the centaurs and minotaurs looking decidedly strange from the waist up (maybe it's the ears). If the story tends towards the one-note, then at least there is an epic sweep to the proceedings that can make you forgive the way that everyone either fits into comic or earnest personality categories, and the warning that war should make the combatants careful of who they ally themselves with if they are going to resort violence is lightly but satisfyingly handled. What this series really needed was a bit of quirk, a necessary spark of eccentricity to make these tales truly come alive, though with a huge budget at stake, it's unsurprising that it does not. Music by Harry Gregson-Williams.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 2402 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star do you think makes the best coffee?
Emma Stone
Anna Kendrick
Michelle Rodriguez
Sir Patrick Stewart
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
George White
Enoch Sneed
Stately Wayne Manor
Paul Smith
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
Aseels Almasi
   

 

Last Updated: