HOME |  CULT MOVIES | COMPETITIONS | ADVERTISE |  CONTACT US |  ABOUT US
 
 
Newest Reviews
Guru the Mad Monk
Jezebel
Monos
Life at the Top
Whoopee Boys, The
Set, The
Cyrano de Bergerac
Death Walks in Laredo
Gemini Man
End of the Century
If Beale Street Could Talk
Raining in the Mountain
Day Shall Come, The
Scandal
Buzzard
Race for Your Life, Charlie Brown
Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon, A
Sons of Denmark
Light of My Life
Umbrellas of Cherbourg, The
Jerky Boys, The
Chambre en Ville, Une
Joker
Relaxer
Mustang, The
Baie des Anges, La
Ready or Not
Seven Days in May
Bliss
Hollywood Shuffle
Uncut Gems
Wilt
Daniel Isn't Real
Presidio, The
Curvature
Puzzle
Farewell, The
Challenge of the Tiger
Ad Astra
Winslow Boy, The
   
 
Newest Articles
Ozploitation Icon: Interview with Roger Ward
Godzilla Goes to Hollywood
Demy-Wave: The Essential Jacques Demy on Blu-ray
The Makings of a Winner: Play It Cool! on Blu-ray
Sony Channel's Before They Were Famous: A Galaxy of Stars
Start Worrying and Hate the Bomb: Fail-Safe on Blu-ray
Completely Different: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 2 on Blu-ray
Bash Street Kid: Cosh Boy on Blu-ray
Seeing is Believing: Being There on Blu-ray
Top Thirty Best (and Ten Worst) Films of the 2010s by Andrew Pragasam
Top of the Tens: The Best Films of the Decade by Graeme Clark
Terrorvision: A Ghost Story for Christmas in the 1970s
Memories Are Made of This: La Jetee and Sans Soleil on Blu-ray
Step Back in Time: The Amazing Mr. Blunden on Blu-ray
Crazy Cats and Kittens: What's New Pussycat on Blu-ray
No Place Like Home Guard: Dad's Army - The Lost Episodes on Blu-ray
A Real-Life Pixie: A Tribute to Michael J. Pollard in Four Roles
We're All In This Together: The Halfway House on Blu-ray
Please Yourselves: Frankie Howerd and The House in Nightmare Park on Blu-ray
Cleesed Off: Clockwise on Blu-ray
Sorry I Missed You: Les Demoiselles de Rochefort on Blu-ray
Silliest of the Silly: Monty Python's Flying Circus Series 1 on Blu-ray
Protest Songs: Hair on Blu-ray
Peak 80s Schwarzenegger: The Running Man and Red Heat
Rock On: That'll Be the Day and Stardust on Blu-ray
   
 
  Attack of the Crab Monsters Creepy CrustaceansBuy this film here.
Year: 1957
Director: Roger Corman
Stars: Richard Garland, Pamela Duncan, Russell Johnson, Leslie Bradley, Mel Welles, Richard H. Cutting, Beach Dickerson, Tony Miller, Ed Nelson, Maitland Stuart, Charles B. Griffith
Genre: Horror, Science Fiction
Rating:  5 (from 1 vote)
Review: There has been an expedition to this hitherto unknown Pacific atoll before, but nobody knows what happened to them - they simply disappeared. As the area is being used for atomic bomb tests, it is going through some measure of upheaval and another expedition has been sent out to investigate the effect the testing has had on the local wildlife and landscape. After fresh bombing causes a tidal wave, the party led by Dale Drewer (Richard Garland), consisting of biologists, botanists and sailors, arrive on one island. But not only is it unstable, it has unwelcoming inhabitants as well...

Somebody tell me Guy N. Smith saw this film, he must have done. Attack of the Crab Monsters was one of the B movies Roger Corman produced and directed from a script by Charles B. Griffith (who also appears as a sailor), but unlike the writer's more celebrated works, such as Little Shop of Horrors or A Bucket of Blood, this was altogether more serious in tone. Not that audiences haven't found the antics on display here to be fairly campy, especially when you see the monsters, but it could still be taken on a more sober level than that.

Using as much stock footage as possible appears to be the main endeavour for Corman here in between shooting his actors on the beach (where they have to shout to be heard over the surf) or on a set depicting their base of operations. The stock footage comes into play whenever anything related to the atomic bombs is seen, so as with about fifty percent of science fiction movies of the fifties there are those shots of massive A-bomb explosions (or are they H-bombs?) that open the proceedings, and the geological effects are represented by huge waves crashing on the shore or landslides.

Yes, landslides, for the characters are on an incredible shrinking island due to the extensive earth tremors the site is suffering. Simple, you think, all they need do is call for help on the radio, but nope, they can only pick up local commercial stations. Well how did they get there in the first place? By seaplane, so why don't they use that to escape? Bit of a snag there, the seaplane has blown up as it was taking off, killing the pilot, so Dale and his intrepid band are as good as trapped. Which would be bad enough on a crumbling atoll, but even worse when you're sharing it with the crab monsters of the title.

Ah, those crab monsters. Well, there's really only one that represents them all, and an ambitiously large puppet it is too with its waving claws and mad, staring eyes (so what if actual crabs don't have mad, staring eyes?). To keep this from being too routine, Griffith had the brainwave to make the creatures telepathic, so when they devour their victims they adopt their personalities and can speak with their voices, projected into the minds of their next potential victims. It can be highly amusing to hear the unlucky actors whose characters have been bumped off dubbed over the ungainly monster, especially when it's Mel Welles doing the voiceover. But for all the affection that this is held in, it's pretty minor Corman and the low budget is painfully obvious. Music by Ronald Stein.
Reviewer: Graeme Clark

 

This review has been viewed 4246 time(s).

As a member you could Rate this film

 

Roger Corman  (1926 - )

Legendary American B-Movie producer and director who, from the fifties onwards, offered low budget thrills with economy and flair. Early films include It Conquered the World, Not of This Earth, Attack of the Crab Monsters, A Bucket of Blood, The Little Shop of Horrors and X. The Intruder was a rare attempt at straightforward social comment.

Come the sixties, Corman found unexpected respectability when he adapted Edgar Allan Poe stories for the screen: House of Usher, Pit and The Pendulum, The Masque of the Red Death and The Tomb of Ligeia among them, usually starring Vincent Price. He even tried his hand at counterculture films such as The Wild Angels, The Trip and Gas!, before turning to producing full time in the seventies.

Many notable talents have been given their break by Corman, such as Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorcese, Monte Hellman, Jonathan Demme, Joe Dante, James Cameron and Peter Bogdanovich. Corman returned to directing in 1990 with the disappointing Frankenstein Unbound.

 
Review Comments (0)


Untitled 1

Login
  Username:
 
  Password:
 
   
 
Forgotten your details? Enter email address in Username box and click Reminder. Your details will be emailed to you.
   

Latest Poll
Which star is the best at shouting?
Arnold Schwarzenegger
Brian Blessed
Tiffany Haddish
Steve Carell
Olivia Colman
Captain Caveman
Sylvester Stallone
Gerard Butler
Samuel L. Jackson
Bipasha Basu
   
 
   

Recent Visitors
Graeme Clark
  Butch Elliot
Andrew Pragasam
Darren Jones
  Rachel Franke
Enoch Sneed
Paul Smith
Paul Shrimpton
   

 

Last Updated: